Archive for May, 2015

A Slam Backfired On This Guy And Cracked 3 Ribs And Bruised His Lung

*This post has been updated as of August 11th 2015 to currently reflect the author’s view. He originally supported Street Beefs, but after further observation decided to change his opinion. 

        A Youtube channel called Street Beefs recently put up a video of a fight between 2 guys who had a dispute to settle. One guy went for a hard slam and instead slammed himself into the ground and broke 3 of his ribs, and bruised his lung. The White Dragon Dojang Taekwondo & Martial Arts Blog has reported on Street Beefs before on an earlier article. To understand this group of people who fight in what is called “Satan’s Backyard,” located somewhere in Virginia, you must know about the owner of the backyard and Youtube channel. Street Beefs is run by an ex-con named Chris Stclair who goes by the moniker Scarface (or Face) who hates cops and Republicans, rich people whom he labels the 5% (which is different than the Occupy Movement’s claim of 1% rich people, and he claims rich people all murder and steel money from everyone), the Confederate battle flag, Fox News, is severely biased against White people who are conservative, loves the Black Panther Party, Loves Obama, believes the USA should be flooded with illegal aliens and says anyone who disagrees has “stupid logic,” is obsessed with racism being everywhere in the USA and has an overall extreme passionate hatred for the police and literally believes all cops want to kill black people.

On his Facebook page, he will tolerate you so long as you do not disagree with his opinion. If you view his page he is constantly obsessed with those who “are fake ass bitches” and is busy explaining why he is humble and legit and has no need for anyone who disagrees with his posts. Basically, he is a conceited know-it-all dictator on his page and Facebook group who is extremely thin skinned and cannot handle 1 ounce of criticism both on social/political issues and martial arts technique. He may add you as a friend and even allow you on the Street Beefs Facebook group, but once you dissent on one of his ignorant comments about cops, his obsession with white racists or any of the absolutely baseless comments he makes he will disown you. He will proceed to ignore you like a passive aggressive girl. His personal Facebook constantly shows anti-cop meme’s and other ridiculousness. He is literally one of the most thin skinned people I have ever met and is extremely close mined, intolerant, and bigoted.

For example here is a post on August 5th:

“I gotta be honest….
If it werent for how good it works for promoting our fights, i would GLEEFULLY delete my facebook account and NEVER look back..
I said it before…my bro craven deleted his fb years ago, and he warned me id hate it…well, i DO.
The fake, funny, strange sh!t i see on here id NEVER deal with in the real world.
When i walk down the street in the real world i dont hear HALF of the bullsh!t opinions, attitudes, and ideas i hear broadcasted on here.
Then you got people who get butthurt for strange reasons (sometimes for NO reason) and suddenly dissapear from your account.
People say sh!t, and take stances theyd NEVER take face to face.

Unfortunatley our fights have grown in a HUGE way scince i started my facebook so if i want STREETBEEFS to be successful, i GOTTA keep this facebook account going..but i just wanted to make it clear how much i fcking HATE facebook sometimes.”

Man it must be so hard to be a gangsta! Having to deal with Facebook and all the opinions of other people. Being an ex convict who was convicted of some pretty bad crimes gives him street cred yo! What is funny is I believe even he wouldn’t talk this way in real life, especially if it had to be with a professional situation like maybe during a job and using tact when dealing with the general public. And he says that people get “butthurt” for strange reasons. Maybe the reasons are not so strange. Maybe it is because he is an asshole and has extremely ignorant and outright wrong views on cops, America, and things of that nature that piss people off. The only person that seems butthurt is Mr. Face. The rest of his (few) minions left are equally as ignorant and suck ups.

The Street Beefs Facebook page is by invite only and a person can get kicked out easily by disagreeing with his far left extremist views. Apparently, thoughtful debate and intellectual discourse used with common sense, facts, and not on pure emotion is something he is not capable of and will just either disown you or want to physically fight you. He comes from a very far left “street tough” background, so if you are into that ok, but if you are somewhat conservative or think for yourself do not even bother commenting.

He claims that their fights are all about “beefs” between people, for various people in their neighborhood who have scores to settle, but in reality most of their fights are just between guys who want to fight or have some competitive match (who both are usually untrained). Once in awhile there is an actual argument that leads to wanting to fight each other who show up in the backyard to fight. It is something to wonder if any of these actual beefs are that serious and just an excuse to get 2 guys on video fighting, and a little attention to the fighters in the video. VICE is now reporting on them and about to put out a documentary. So, apparently it worked. We will see what kind of angle VICE will take on it when the documentary is released. It should be hilarious, especially because the hipsters at VICE news constantly create false impressions of things and make them a bigger deal than they really are.

Another thing about this channel is their training videos do not emphasize proper techniques and encourage people not to fight with correct technique or even use the speed bag properly. It is very odd. Even so, the concept itself isn’t bad and it provides some hilarious entertainment, and some fun fights here and there. Just do not expect to be friendly with this dude if you suggest even the slightest that 1. The guys fighting should train at a martial arts gym or boxing gym and learn how to actually fight properly, and 2. that you disagree to the smallest faction with his cop hating liberal ideology that gives excuses for criminal thugs. You will get banned instantly, so it is best to watch in silence.

If you criticize the lack of safety, lack of skill or training, bad technique he himself espouses, bad reffing etc., he will simply just insult you or block you. After this video, though, there have been some safety concerns and at least they changed things to prevent something this bad happening again. So I give them credit. I do not think the “Street Beefs’ idea is necessarily bad. I supported it pretty well in the beginning when if irst encountered this channel, but I have my doubts any truly serious “beefs” have actually been in this backyard. And most of the fighters suck and have no real technique, and the few of their “great fighters” are basically white belt level. But they have heart and enthusiasm that is pretty good. Scarface himself has fought a few times and is looking for challengers, but for some reason they always either cancel and back out, or he just isn’t looking for serious competitors harfd enough. The way he fights it is obvious that if any trained fighter fought him he would get knocked out or submitted really easily. Hopefully someone good fights him because his opponents have all sucked and most of the MMA community online knows it. That is why he gets s much criticism, and boy he sure cannot handle that!

Now on to the fight. In this video, the fight was between guy’s who go by the aliases Phoenix an Jordanian Nightmare.

This is the Jordanian Nightmare:

This is Pheonix, he has intense “beef” against the Jordanian Nightmare. This was Pheonix before he slammed himself into oblivion:

        In the actual fight video shown below, Phoenix seems to be outclassing the Jordanian Nightmare with decent boxing maneuvers. Then Jordanian Nightmare does a spin kick to the Phoenix’s knee which sets him off balance briefly but he recovers really fast and it did not phase him. Even so the low spin kick attempt was pretty cool an could have been effective if he hit the right target on the leg. Phoenix then continues to dominate against his opponent and takes his back and goes for a suplex! Unfortunately, he seemed to forget that in a suplex you grab the body lower, arch/bridge your back more, and make sure the other guys head or upper-back in the shoulder area hits the ground first. Instead he pulls his opponent directly on top of him as he falls back slamming his own back on the dirt and grass as well as allowing his opponents full body weight to crash down on top of him. Fight over. Cracked ribs, bruised lung, and agony ensue. He was totally airborne when he slammed too! He was taken to an ER shortly after this and he seems to be doing better and will recover. But dang!!

        This shows that fighting outside in another environment other than a gym or competition cage or ring can yield different results. Most likely if this was done in an MMA fight on a matted cage surface he would not have had this bad of an injury. The ground is deadly and this is why martial arts such as Judo that emphasize throwing and slams are seriously deadly. Imagine a fight on cement where someone was thrown hard on it. Instant death possibly. This is why Judo has the rule of ippon which means “one full point” in Japanese. This is basically “one finishing slam or technique” which would end the fight. Ippon basically means “fight ender” and is an expression used in Japanese martial arts sports such as Karate and Judo to declare a point that usually counts as an instant win. This has the philosophy as a technique being deadly and ending a fight. In Judo the throws and slams that land an opponent on their back are victories. But not very often to people in such sports ippon themselves like Phoenix did. This is why backyard fighting or street fighting is pretty dangerous and should not just happen with unprofessionals watching in a backyard unless there have been serious safety measures put in place.

        In a real fight a person needs to try not to harm them self by doing crazy wrestling moves. Make sure you can pull them off before attempting. Wrestlers often miscalculate the necessity to wear pants over shorts on rough ground, and sometimes don’t have the sense that the outside ground is not a high school wrestling mat. Do not ippon yourself! So what did it prove for this dude to get that injured in a local backyard? Was it worth it? Was their “serious beef” so serious it HAD to end this way? I doubt it.

        Street Beefs has recently been reported on and filmed by the VICE News channel and will put out a mini documentary on their activities for their Fight Land special interest channel that covers MMA an other martial arts stories. So be sure to pay attention for that and check it out. Check out the Street Beefs YouTube page for some hilarious entertainment of guys flailing arms and limbs fighting in a backyard other silly antics, such as Face’s explanations for why fights are cancelled, all his haters who thin he should learn from a gym and fight real opponents and things of that nature. Enjoy!

ITF Sine-Wave Madness

        Absolute madness!!!! The more I watch International Taekwon-Do Federation style videos, or read about their martial art the more I think it is a cult. Cults tend to repeat things over, and over, and over, and over, and over until the weak minded who question nothing believe it is true. This is exactly what is going on with Choi’s last attempt to ruin Taekwondo in his later years proving he knows hardly anything about real combat, self defense, or physics: the Sine-Wave. Just watch the below video of a Korean master teaching his many expert, hardcore black belt ITF fighters:

How the HELL does that make ANY SENSE! Going up and down makes your forward punches harder? NO FREAKING WAY THIS IS TRUE! Read Newtons’ 3 laws of motion:

  • Things that are still stay still and things that are moving keep moving with a steady speed unless a force of some kind pushes or pulls on them.
  • When a force acts (pushes or pulls) on an object, it changes the object’s speed or direction (in other words, makes it accelerate). The bigger the force, the more the object accelerates.
  • When a force acts on an object, there’s an equal force (called a reaction) acting in the opposite direction. This law is sometimes written “action and reaction are equal and opposite.”

Law #1 says something that is moving will only change speed by pushing or pulling. Law #2 says that something has to be pushed or pulled to speed up, but it will change direction if pulled in another direction, not speed up because it is going in another direction.  Law #3 is just saying that there is a reaction to every action.

Laws 2 and 3 do not at all explain the sine-wave theory Choi Hong Hi thought up. In the video if that Korean instructor decided to bounce up and down in horse stance it is not at all affecting the power or speed of his punches. His fists are being thrown out forward. For them to speed up something would have to either push his fists even more harder, or something would have to pull his fists forward faster. A force pulling them down would not at all increase their speed. I did not know that the ITF not only does horse stance, but took the idea of “horse riding stance” to mean pretending you are literally on a horse and bouncing up and down as the horse gallops down the road beneath you. The use of gravity to accelerate a punch and to give it more power on impact, if the punch is thrown perpendicular to the pull of gravity is erroneous physics. The Sine-Wave is bogus, it does not work! And it looks stupid!

The ITF sine wave horse riding stance in action:

All she needs to do is start throwing punches!

Just because ITF instructors scream until your ears bleed that the sine wave is a genius theory and makes you punch seriously effective and powerful does not make it true. The sine-wave is why ITF forms look like an 8 year old who just watched Power Rangers Dino Charge and is now outside in his front yard pretending to fight all the alien bad guys. Seriously, ITF forms look like crap. No precision, no finesse, no crispness, no real accuracy. Watch the old ITF videos of all the “tul” and it looks terrible. Even the uniform is ugly. Watch current “world champions” of sine wave forms of the ITF and it bounces up and down even worse with an even louder SHOOOSHHHHH on every freaking technique.

ITF reminds me of various cults who split up and have tons of in-fighting with other factions who separated from the first group for whatever reasons, who keep claiming they have the real truth of the religion. There are 4 ITF groups in the world. Which one is the real Choi Taekwon-Do (and it MUST be spelled with a hyphen!!! or else you are not writing the REAL name of the martial art and are blaspheming Choi!!!)

One of the comments on the video, if you go to the YouTube page, was posted by user Dragon Phillips who said,

“The sine wave terminology was taken from Electronics Engineering. The ITF has been made insignificant by WTF strategies and advancements over the past 30 years or so. I have studied several Martial Arts Styles or systems to include being a former ITF Instructor. The ITF was at one time a solid Martial Arts choice. That has changed. The so called sine wave principle is an ineffective ITF concept to energize what little base the organization has left. The so called ITF sine wave principle is not logical or practical in the “real world” application of martial arts techniques.”

Now watch this ITF cult member use psuedo science, or flat out wrong science, to explain why the sine wave increases power to his punches in the following video:

He thinks because big people can punch harder than a smaller person you can increase your weight per punch using the sine wave. If you press down on the floor hard it increases your weight and you will no longer punch like a smaller person, but like a larger person. So if there is a dangerous 220 lb guy punching, a 160 lb guy can now punch the same because he used the sine wave by increasing his weight by pushing on the ground hard.

He talks like a typical spokesperson for a cult. He talks confident with excited emotion and says things like “force,” “mass,” “leverage,” and sounds all “sciency” but his ideas are totally bogus. Also, when he gets to the body twisting portion of the video it contradicts everything Choi said. Choi clearly says you do not twist your body, but only go down then up and down again. Later, the guy uses the example of that viral video of the fake Kung Fu master who lines up 20 guys up and pushes them all backward. The ITF guy even quotes Bruce Lee trying to give himself some credibility. At the end of his video he even claims that all martial arts use “some or all of these techniques” of the sine wave theory. But anyone who has taken a basic science course in physics can understand that the sine wave would not increase power in strikes. Also, from the look of the video his punches look incredibly weak.

ITF reminds me of cults like Scientology and their “scientific practices” of Dianetics. Sine-Wave theory is the ITF organizations Dianetics. Don’t ask why it works, or question its validity, just do it and be one of the “enlightened.”

Chuan Fa Influencing Early Taekwondo With Bajiquan From Ju An Pa Kung Fu 

        Kung Fu is often listed as a martial art that influenced the formation of Taekwondo in Korea. A Modern History of Taekwondo explains that the founding master named Yoon Byung In of the kwan Chang Moo Kwan (AKA YMCA Kwon Bup Bu) lived in Manchuria, China during his early childhood. There he learned the Chinese martial art called Ju An Pa (1999, A Modern History of Taekwondo, p. 7). I could not find any information on what exactly Ju An Pa is, or was, but people often label it Chuan Fa. It is a common thing to read on Wikipedia when looking up information on the early kwans, or when reading Taekwondo websites that have a history page, that something called Chuan Fa was practiced by early kwan leaders or was influential in the forming of Taekwondo. But that term simply means “Chinese martial arts” and has no distinction of a specific Kung Fu style. Apparently, the words Chuan Fa are a Chinese term meaning “law of the fist” (Oriental Outpost, date accessed 2015). So like the term “Kung Fu,” “Chuan Fa” is also an umbrella term for various Chinese martial arts. Much like the word Karate is an umbrella term for Japanese and Okinawan arts.

        It is explained in a Modern History of Taekwondo that Yoon Byung In trained with Chun Sang Sup (Founder of Choson Yoon Moo Kwon, which became Jidokwan) pretty much all the time. They trained so much together that they were labeled brothers in the martial arts (p. 7). Wikipedia also mentions they traveled to Manchuria together and train in Kung Fu together. This emphasizes that even the Jidokwan (formerly the Choson Yoon Moo Kwon Kong Soo Do Bu) must have dabbled in Kung Fu, or at least Yoon’s “Ju An Pa” influenced them. Wikipedia also states on the Chang Moo Kwan page that a style called Bajiquan influenced Taekwondo. Yet the source they cite cannot be found. A few websites of random Taekwondo school’s with a history page have also listed Bajiquan as a style that influenced Taekwondo. Just simply type “Kung Fu influence on Taekwondo” or “Bajiquan influence of Taekwondo” and you will see pages that claim this. Other sources not worth mentioning will simply list Kung Fu or Chuan Fa as a style that influenced Taekwondo. When I first saw Bajiquan being listed on Wikipedia I instantly went to look for youtube videos on the style to compare it to Taekwondo movements. Later, one blog I found that emphasizes ITF “Taekwon-Do” claims that Bajiquan influenced Chang Moo Kwan, and “probably” influenced the Jidokwan (So Shim Kwan, 2011, date accessed 2015). I have not found any academic sources or other types of “really credible” sources that mention Bajiquan or what kind of Kung Fu influenced Taekwondo, but I think the author of that ITF blog is right. Yet, I hate to actually agree with an ITF person’s view of Taekwondo history, but this part of Taekwondo history does not have to do with General Choi so I think it is acceptable to agree (note the sarcasm). I actually think it is plausible that Bajiquan did influence Taekwondo. It is a fact that Kung Fu (Chuan Fa or “Chinese styles”) influenced Taekwondo, and Yoon Byung In and Chun Sang Sup had access to it (in the form of Ju An Pa) and most likely taught the concepts in their gyms.

        I think it is possible thatt Ju An Pa must have been a name of a style directly related to, or an off shoot, of Bajiquan. Of course I cannot be sure 100%. There are several systems of Bajiquan created by various masters throughout the ages. This Chinese style also developed in areas within Manchuria where Yoon Byung In grew up. This style most likely developed from Shaolin Temple styles like most Kung Fu did in the North of China. I believe that it is more than likely that Ju An Pa is actually Bajiquan. A possible explanation for a strange name could be that his local instructor wanted to name his teaching something different like many instructors do. As there are many types of Karate with various names, Ju An Pa could be a name for a specific type of Bajiquan that his teacher developed that would label his style a more personal name. If anyone reading this knows what Ju An Pa means in Chinese let me know in the comments. Ju An Pa could also be a style that had influences from carious kinds of Kung Fu styles including Bajiquan techniques. I think that Yoon Byung In had to have been exposed to various kinds of Kung Fu in Manchuria besides the Ju An Pa he was dedicated to. Martial artists often trade techniques such as a kick or punch.

        The full name of this Chinese martial art (or Chuan Fa method) is Kai Men Baji Quan which means “Open-Gate Eight-Extremities Fist.” If a reader of this blog wants to know what that name means or why there are “8 extremities” I suggest looking up the martial art style and researching it. This article is not about researching Bajiquan, but about movements and concepts within it that I see have influenced certain motions within Taekwondo. I am not saying Taekwondo looks like Bajiquan, but that Taekwondo has subtle motions which are similar techniques and could possibly have the similar applications. I have found some video evidence that supports this. On quick notice it is apparent that Bajiquan looks absolutely nothing like Taekwondo. This is obvious, but the concepts of some of the motions actually do look similar. Bajiquan is a quick, explosive, and very intense form of Kung Fu. Taekwondo is mostly slow and rigid with a step-by-step basis. Yet, some of the Taekwondo poomsae do in fact flow more and are faster when it comes to advanced black belt forms. Some of these forms have motions that look similar to what can be seen in Bajiquan. Before I explain how Bajiquan has similar motions with Taekwondo I will first explain a little about Karate’s influence on Taekwondo.

        Taekwondo takes another approach to training movements. A slower or more singly-concentrated effort with power for each step. The rhythm is different from Karate and Kung Fu with each step being one at a time. Kung Fu styles can slow up and speed up as they go. Bajiquan shows intense power, slowly winding up then fast bursts of power. Karate often has a step-by-step way of moving one at a time, but there are often parts of their forms which explode in speed with multiple hand motions and faster stepping as well as going off line diagonally. Karate can throw a punch with one step, then take 2-3 fast steps exploding with fast bursts of hand speed with blocks and counter strikes. There are also very slow, flowing, meditative, multiple hand motions in Karate for each step more often than in Taekwondo.

       This below video is a good example of how Karate uses multiple flowing hand motions within one stance, and also speeds up and slows down and uses various angles of attack and defense. Instead of going in straight lines up, down, left and right, Karate often goes into diagonal lines. So Karate could be going forward, but then go off to the side diagonally to block or attack. Also in the video notice the many slow hand motions and directional changes that are different from Taekwondo.

Another example of fast bursts of speed instead of just one step at a time is this female Japanese Kata champion:

Taekwondo forms usually stay within the same rhythm and do not slow up or speed up very often. For example this daughter of a famous Taekwondo grandmaster performing Tae Geuk Pal Jang:

        Taekwondo is basically a step and strike/kick, or a step and block way of doing forms. A couple of forms have 2 or 3 blocks in one stance, and hardly any multiple, slow flowing, meditative hand motions in it per stance (examples are how Koryo has one meditative breathing motion in the form not counting the ready stance, Tae Geuk Yuk Jang also has only one etc.) Where Karate might have 2 or 3 separate meditative hand motions and deep breathing within one stance, Taekwondo usually has 1 within a stance. Taekwondo is a very slow paced stepping martial art when practicing forms. Yet, this allows a practitioner to concentrate more power into each strike and each block. It is less about looking attractive and more about practical motions. This is not to say Taekwondo does not look good. It is just a different theory of martial arts movement. Most of the founding masters of Taekwondo had high black belt ranks in Karate and originally taught Karate forms to their students. Why Taekwondo became slower paced and 1 step at a time and less flowing, I have no clue. It just developed that way and the people who created the Taekwondo forms back in the day must have decided they wanted to move less complicated and at a slower pace for whatever reason. Originally, the Pal Gwe set of forms were created which incorporated motions that were copied from parts of various Karate forms called the Pinan set. But they were modified and changed slighty, yet the same movement is apparent. Kyokushin Karate is a form of Karate that moves slower more like Taekwondo does. It also developed into more singular stepping in an unchanging rhythm. Kyokushin uses the Pinan Kata’s which show almost the same motions as the Pal Gwe Poomsae in certain parts. Examples:

Kyokushin Karate motion in a Pinan form (only watch from 2:50-2:56):

Taekwondo motion in a Pal Gwe form (only watch from 1:13-1:18):

Here is an example of the Shotokan pinan movements (watch 0:29-0:35 only):

Notice the differences yet its the same kind of motions, just slightly different, but essential the same application.

Also, the high black belt level form TaeBaek also uses the same motion (watch from 0:40-0:46 only):

Most of Taekwondo’s motions are variations of Karate motions, but done slightly different. The Pinans were developed from Shotokan and taught by early masters of Taekwondo, most specifically in Tang Soo Do. But various Karate styles incorporate them into their curriculum.

Later the Kukkiwon decided to make new forms called the Tae Geuk set which uses short stances mixed in with the standard long stances. If one is lucky he can find an instructor that will teach him both Pal Gwe an Tae Geuk forms.

Taekwondo is very much like Karate. I have the opinion that Taekwondo is 80% Karate and 15% Kung Fu and %5 modern renditions of Taekyeon (at least in spirit from what historical ideas that the Koreans found to re-create Taekyeon in order to instill national pride by trying to reclaim their culture lost from Japanese occupation). So most Taekwondo motions and forms are practiced very hard, rigid, and slower than Kung Fu and most Karate. Chuan Fa (Kung Fu) is more fluid and soft with various wild movements. Kung Fu looks great for dancing, yet Taekwondo looks stupid for dancing (but why are the Koreans doing this Taekwon-Dance trend!!!)    

Now back to Bajiquan! Practically every serious martial artist that trains in Taekwondo knows about the historic Japanese and Okinawan Karate roots of Taekwondo. But hardly anyone knows about the Kung Fu roots. People know there was a Kung Fu influence, but no one I know of can explain the exact types of Kung Fu that influenced Taekwondo except for what I read in A Modern History of Taekwondo which said Ju An Pa was a style that was practiced. But understanding the area Yoon Byung In grew up, and the types of martial arts taught in Manchuria, and the ways these styles move, and comparing them to certain Taekwondo forms, it suggests that Bajiquan is possibly a main style that influenced Taekwondo in various motions, and Ju An Pa is probably a type of Bajiquan.

        I will try to mark where, in the video’s below of Bajiquancertain motions are possibly influential to Taekwondo. To understand which movements you need only to watch the time limits I list.

1. The Bajiquan Long Form

2. Another version of the same form

3. Various Bajiquan forms

Notice the straight line movements. It keeps going forward with a lot of power. There are a few Taekwondo high black belt forms that behave in a similar way, all though without the same speed of Kung Fu flair. The forms that come to mind are Pyongwon, Sipjin, Jitae, Cheonkwon, and Hansu.

Upward elbow strikes

Bajiquan apparently is known for elbow strikes. Watch the first video at 0:12-0:141:23-1:25, 0:57-0:59, and 2:41-2:43.

Watch the second video at 0:09-0:10, and 2:09-2:11.

The Hong Kong TV Show called Kung Fu Quest did an episode on Bajiquan and showed an elbow strike. View the following video from 2:50-2:53.

Now watch the Taekwondo form Pyongwon video below from 0:26-0:27, and at 0:38-0:39.

Notice the elbow strike? It is a different stance, yet it has the same principle of an upward elbow attack from close range. The Taekwondo stance is opposite leg and arm, and the Bajiquan stance is same arm, same leg. Just like the Bajiquan master on the episode of Kung Fu Quest said, it is an attack they least expect. I know that Karate has upward elbow strikes as well, but this is just one similarity I see with Bajiquan and Taekwondo. The Pyongwong form also happens to be in a straight line much like Bajiquan’s form.

Linear directions and forceful stepping

        In this straight forward motion they use momentum to give power to strikes. Here is an example from the first video. Watch the first Bajiquan video up above at 0:27-0:30, and 1:47-1:54.

Now contrast the forward stepping and punches with the move in the Taekwondo form called Sipjin. Watch from 0:27-0:30, and 0:36-0:39.

Notice the forward stepping motion with a punch. I believe that is possibly one type of motion Taekwondo took from Bajiquan. It is of course practiced in a slower Taekwondo fashion, but it is nonetheless a forward stepping punch motion into horse stance much like Bajiquan’s. It allows for serious power in the punch going through the target.

“Santeul makki,” mountain blocking, or twin wide open blocking

        In Sipjin there is another move I notice that Bajiquan uses. It is what Taekwondo calls a “mountain block” which is hecho santeul makki in Korean. It is also known as “twinw ide open blocking.” Pyongwon also uses the same move. Looking up above at both the Sipjin an Pyongwon videos you will notice the move. The following video is an explanation:

Notice how the Bajiquan videos have this similar movement. Watch the very first Bajiquan video from 0:49-0:51, and 2:28-2:30.  Watch the third Bajiquan video from 0:32-0:34, and 5:27-5:33. Now of course they do it slightly different, and possibly their version are some sort of “hammer fist” strikes out to the side, or they could be blocks as well. The application for the Taekwondo movement of hecho santeul makki is the idea of breaking an attackers elbows who is grabbing you in front. You trap his arms and force your arms upward into his joints and break them. The Bajiquan movement could have similar application as well.

Downward hammer fist to the head level

        Tae Geuk O Jang, and Pal Gwe Pal Jang forms both have a downward hammer first strike. It is called mejumeok naryeo chigi. View the following videos:

Tae Geuk O Jang (watch from 0:58-1:20):

Pal Gwe Pal Jang (watch from 1:18-1:28):

Now watch the Bajiquan videos. First view video 1 of the Bajiquan videos above. Watch from 0:14-0:150:47-0:50, 1:24-1:27, and 2:23-2:26. Now watch the second Bajiquan video above from 0:23-0:25, 0:13-0:16, and 1:26-1:29. And finally, watch the third Bajiquan video from 1:51-1:53, 2:33-2:34.

The same motion is apparent. Of course it is done in a fluid Chinese way of moving as well as a different stance, but it is still possible that these motions were part of early kwan martial arts because of Byung In Moon and Chun Sung Sup’s Kung Fu teaching. Possibly these movements were common within early Korean Taekwondo and were put inside Pal Gwe Pal Jang, and later reissued into Tae Gaek O Jang. But then, if Karate also has these motions it could have come from Karate. But Karate originally developed from Kung Fu as well. I still think the downward hammer fists with the application of clearing a grab off of your wrist by swinging it underneath the armpit and your opposite hand’s palm clearing your wrist is probably from Kung Fu.

Fist to palm pulling motion juchumsegi palmok pyojeok chigi

        There is a motion in Taekwondo where one pulls the fist to the palm of the hand. The only poomsae that has the fist to palm or wrist pulling back motion is Hansu. This motion is called juchumsegi palmok pyojeok chigi or arae pyojeok makki. The first means horse stance, wrist target strike. The second means underneath (or low, or downward), target blocking. You can say it both ways.

Here is the technique:

Watch this video of Hansu from 0:31-0:33, and again from 0:45-0:47.

Watch this next Hansu video from 1:58-2:06:

And also watch this last Hansu video from 0:36-0:38, 4:42-4:59.

Bajiquan also has this same type of motion, although not identical, it still has the same motion and most likely a similar application.

Watch the very first Bajiquan video up above from 0:37-0:39, and from 2:06-2:08.

Watch the second Bajiquan video from 1:00-1:02.

And watch the third video from 0:19-0:21, 2:10-2:13, and 3:58-4:02.

        Of course, just as the other movements mentioned in this article, the move is not done exactly the same as the Taekwondo way, yet it is very much similar. It has the same concept. The Bajiquan guys are doing it higher on the wrist and arm, whereas the Taekwondo way is hitting the top of the fist into the palm of the other hand. I know this movement is also apparent in other Chinese martial arts as well. I firmly believe this move did not come from Japanese Karate, but from the Kung Fu roots of Taekwondo whether it be directly from Bajiquan or another style. Like I said before, Yoon Byung In had to have been exposed by various Chinese styles with similar movements.

 Simultaneous high block and face punch, keumgang apjireugi

        The movement of a high block simultaneous with a high punch to the face is called keumgang apjireugi. This means “diamond high punch,” or “diamond face punch.” An example of this movement is in the forms Jitae, and Cheonkwon.

Example of the movement in Jitae (watch from 0:44-0:46):

Example of the movement in Cheonkwon (watch from 0:59-1:05):

Now if you watched the sequence from 0:59-1:05 you will see the man do the movement 2 times. He does a sequence of movements with a downward double knife hand block, scissor block, the high block and face punch, butteerfly kick, then again the high block to face punch. He does keumgang apjireugi twice. If he was not wearing a Taekwondo uniform and was in regular clothing would you be able to tell that what he did in that sequence was Taekwondo in itself? I think a person could easily assume it was Kung Fu. The form Cheonkwon is full of Kung Fu types of movements.

Now see how Bajiquan has the same movement:

Again go back to the very fist Bajiquan video above in the list and watch from 0:33-0:34, and from 1:57-1:59.

Now go to the third Bajiquan video and watch from 1:01-1:04, 1:15-1:17, 3:31-3:37, 3:49-3:51, 4:03-4:05, 4:14-4:17, and 4:30-4:32.

The movement is the same as the Taekwondo technique. It is likely that Taekwondo got this move from Bajiquan. Now of course this may have come from Karate, but with the fluid Chinese style movements in Cheonkwon I believe this move came from either Bajiquan or another Kung Fu style. Various styles of Kung Fu have the same movement as well. Even so, reflecting on Yoon Byung In and his Manchurian Kung Fu training I think it is very plausible it came from his Ju An Pa or Bajiquan influence on his training.

        Now of course there are other movements I could go over, but this article was tedious enough. I could also mention other forms like Tae Geuk Chil Jang with its palm block in tiger stance, and tiger stance and back fist over the arm, and inside crescent kicks to the palm  into elbow strike. I could also mention cross stepping from Tae Geuk Pal Jang and the outsie block into elbow strike to punch as well. I could mention the butterfly kick in Cheonkwon too. These movements are all very Kung Fu-like. Especially the butterfly kick. Chinese martial arts are full of the tornado crescent style kick that is called the butterfly kick in Taekwondo. The move here you do a tornado crescent kick into the palm of your hand. Chinese martial arts have always had the inside the foot kicking to palm of the hand as well as the flying spinning tornado-like crescent kicks. Okinawan Karate of course also has small inside crescent kicks as well, but I believe the ones from Taekwondo come from the Kung Fu influence from various Chuan Fa styles, most most likely the Ju An Pa, or Bajiquan styles.

        I think by the time the poomsae of Taekwondo was being created these Bajiquan techniques were common practice in the early formation of Taekwondo and added in. They not only have a combat application, but they also look really aesthetically pleasing and display athleticism and agility. I think the Chang Moo Kwon and Jidokwan collaborated and had influence on the other kwons.

        There are many reasons why Taekwondo turned into a slow paced martial art in their forms doing one step at a time. The main reason is because most kwon leaders were Shotokan and Shudokan Karate masters and some were already practicing the Karate style in the form of Tang Soo Do, the Koreanized version of Karate. Both Yoon Byung In an Chun Sang Sup were Karate masters with high black belt levels. Yoon Byung In was so passionate about martial arts he received a 5th degree black belt in Shudokan Karate from Toyama Kanken when he went to Japan to study abroad. He most likely dedicated himself more to Karate than Kung Fu and his Karate influence must have influenced his Kung Fu interpretations of movements. It is said he still taught his students his Chinese martial art style as well. But why Taekwondo is not more Kung “Fooish” than it is, is probably because his Karate mastery became more prevalent in his personal expression as well as the other kwon leaders all studying Karate. Chun Sang Sup of Chosun Yun Moo Kwon Kong Soo Do Bu (Jidokwan) also studied Karate first as well as Judo before he collaborated with Yoon Byung In‘s Kung Fu. Yoon Byung In possibly started to like Karate more than his Chuan Fa as he gained such a high level of expertise in it over the years.

        Since most of the kwon leaders were Karate masters (iroically excluding General Choi since there is absolutely NO evidence he got above 2nd dan in Karate) as well as studied Judo one can see why the early Korean masters adopted the Japanese gi (uniform) and not other kinds of clothing like you see in Chinese styles. Chinese styles have no belt system, but Japan was so influential on Korean culture they adopted the belt system as well and the same uniform. Only later did they create the v-neck style that we wear today. One can see how Taekwondo is heavily influenced by Karate, yet now after understanding the knowledge about Chuan Fa movement through Bajiquan and what Ju An Pa possibly was one can also see how Taekwondo has a very real Kung Fu influence from China. Taekwondo is a very eclectic martial art. This has given Taekwondo the ability to refine, and adapt techniques over time to make them better. Taekwondo technique is still being refined and researched by the Kukkiwon in Korea today.

Video Analysis Of Kung Fu Influence On Taekwondo 

        It is true that there is a slight Kung Fu influence on Taekwondo when it comes to self defense and certain movements. I have found a couple of Eagle Claw style, Kung Fu forms videos that show a few similar movements found in Taekwondo, high black belt level forms.

Here is a video showing Eagle Claw’s form called Kung Lek Keun which is translated “Power Fist.” Just watch the beginning motion as he starts. He raises his arms upward and then moves his elbows straight down hard.

That motion is the same move found in the Taekwondo form called Sipjin which is translated “10.”

The beginning motion in this form is called a “bull block” but it is done with tension and slow movement.

Then is uses explosive power downward. A bull block itself blocks simultaneous, sideways strikes coming at you at a high level toward your head. This is different from simple upward blocks. But in this form this movement is actually an escape from someone holding you from behind. The fists come up through the arms and the elbows jam and pull down on the attacker enabling you space to escape.

Another Eagle Claw form is called Jeet Kuen which is translated as “Quick Fist.” Again, just watch the beginning motion. He raises his arms in a circular motion outward and comes up with a double hand strike to the chin area. His palms are open and fingers are jabbing the attacker’s throat or underneath the chin.

It is similar to the Taekwondo form called Cheonkwon which is translated as “Heaven’s Great Might.”

The beginning motion in this form has the same circular direction of the arms moving and an upward double hand strike. The only difference is the Taekwondo form goes into a “tiger stance” with a double, middle knuckle-fist strike upwards to the chin level instead of finger jabs. This motion is actually a simultaneous palm block sweeping away a high attack such as a headbutt. If a person has grabbed you and headbutts toward you the 2 palms, you push away his forehead, and a counter with 2 middle knuckle strikes just underneath his chin will knock the attacker out saving you from your head and nose getting bashed by his forehead. This motion is called a “Spring Punch.”

What is interesting is that the Taekwondo form Cheonkwon has the idea of “great sky” such as “watching an eagle fly high in the sky” and the emotions felt when a man looks at how great and high the sky is. It is very interesting how it alludes to a great sky such as seeing an eagle fly so high which is reminiscent to Eagle Claw. The very beginning of the form has the palms extended out sideways on both sides which has the meaning of “the bird expanding its wings.” Much like an eagle expands it wings and stretches them out as it launches off a cliff to fly.

There are also similarities with the circular palm blocking followed by a punch in Cheonkwon and some movements the Eagle Claw form showed. Another big movement that the Eagle Claw stylist shows is the butterfly kick which is the same kind of kick seen near the end of Cheonkwon with the tornado-like spin and kicking the palm of the hand in the air.

This is not to say that the exact Kung Fu style of Eagle Claw influenced Taekwondo directly. That is an overstatement. What this comparison shows is that Kung Fu, as in Chinese martial arts concepts themselves, are apparent within Taekwondo. Martial arts traditions like Taekwondo have techniques that can be traced back to ancient times. Similar concepts passed along through the ages that appear in various martial arts throughout Asia. This is something to be proud of as a Taekwondo fighter.

Taekwondo For Fighting Slip Rope Training

        Here is a great drill for working on fast footwork and speed and head movement.

Dodging punches and kicks is important. This drill uses twine taped to posts. You can use it for fast pivoting and footwork and ducking punches. Make sure to throw punches and kicks as well. I have tied 4 strings around in various places, in the middle it makes kind of an “x” or “+” shape. You can duck and slip under in multiple directions. This drill will make your legs strong and help with instability. If you have joint problems this drill might be tough, but if you do it right it is a fun way to work on strengthening the thigh muscles from the squatting down over and over. This drill also can simulate multiple attackers from various directions. Do this in 3 minute drills. Try it! This is Taekwondo for serious fighting and MMA.

Try it yourself!