Posts Tagged ‘Mixed Martial Arts’

Amazing Double Combo Back Kick In MMA By Amir Elzhurkaev

        In Russia, at the Absolute Championship Berkut 34 event recently, Amir Elzhurkaev threw a powerful liver shot by way of back kick. It was performed as a double kicking combo with a front leg side/or push kick (AKA cut kick) in the air followed by a rear leg back kick. It went straight into his opponent, Dmitrity Tomaev’s, liver. It knocked him out. Just another display of beautiful Taekwondo stuff working in MMA….Taekwondo is serious business and MMA fighters need to learn it and stop being pansies and petending it doesn’t work because they fear what the popular toolbag consensus of ignorant MMA meatheads believe about traditional martial arts. Not there is anything wrong with MMA, being an MMA fan, or training MMA, or supporting MMA; because I do; the point is the naysayers who are still claiming that Taekwondo’s flashy kicks have no place in a real fight.

THE VIDEO:

And my musical score made by the sounds of his kicks being rewound *LOL*:

I did not want to brush my hair and I was very bored…enjoy!

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Training MMA In Korea

        I was invited to train with a small club for amateur MMA who meets at the gym where I train. We trained on Sunday and it was pretty hard training. We did pad drills, takedown drills and various kinds of sparring such as grappling with punches sparring, stand up striking like Muay Thai style sparring and NoGi grappling parring and finally MMA sparring. Of course we used plenty of control to make sure we were safe and no one got injured; but that does not mean it didn’t hurt or it wasn’t tough! It was! And it did hurt! But it was a good experience to make me a better fighter and martial artist. If I plan to teach Taekwondo I want to know what I am made of and if I am worthy of being an instructor who teaches people how to fight.

        I just have a sore jaw, nose and of course my injuries on my body are very sore from the past surgeries I have had. Some of the guys are advances in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Boxing, and Kickboxing. One guy who was nearly 6’5″ was a professional MMA fighter in Korea and a Korea Kickboxing champion. The rest were beginners. One was a wrestler/grappler with no striking experience. So we just had a lot of fun!

        Padwork

       MMA NoGi Grappling Sparring

       Stand Up Kicboxing Sparring

It was a goo training session and it gave me more confidence and showed me may weaknesses to try and fix. I hope to keep getting more confidence so I will not fear fighting and be a stronger person.

 

 

A Wonderful And Devastating Display Of Traditional Martial Arts At UFC Fight Night 82

        There was a wonderful display of traditional striking techniques shown by Stephan Thompson, a Kempo Karate expert and elite kickboxer at UFC Fight Night 82. Johnny Hendrick’s was on the receiving end up a few hard kicks and punches that knocked him out. A great article about this topic can be seen on Bleacher Report. You should give it a read.

From Bleacher Report:
“The traditional martial arts have long gotten short shrift in modern MMA. The Gracie family sponsored early UFCs as glorified infomercials for their Brazilian jiu-jitsu fighting style and quickly proved their point—that a fighter had to know how to grapple to succeed in real-world hand-to-hand combat situations.
Their early dominance briskly undid many previously long-held conventions about how to fight. Simply put, the Gracies made a lot of traditional, stand-up-oriented martial artists look like fools. Even as the legendary family faded from prominence in MMA, practitioners of no-frills western systems like wrestling and kickboxing largely went on to dominate the next two decades.
Jae C. Hong/Associated Press
Chuck Liddell throws his trademark overhand right.
Classic movie-house forms were summarily overshadowed. A lot of professional fighters may well have started in karate, taekwondo or kung fu as kids, but few of them fought like it once they arrived in the Octagon.
Former light heavyweight champion Chuck Liddell—or at least his deltoid tattoo—claimed allegiance to kempo karate, but he fought like a brawling kickboxer when it mattered.
Welterweight kingpin Georges St-Pierre boasted a background in kyokushin, but he was known more for his dynamic wrestling during the heart of his UFC career.
Only light heavyweight titlist Lyoto Machida stood out for his classic karate fighting style—and his reign on top was so short it became a punch line. Machida’s elusiveness and counterstriking were always his calling card, but his patient, unorthodox methods sometimes seemed to work against him when judged according to MMA’s unified rules.
Andre Penner/Associated Press
Lyoto Machida is one of the few to find success through karate.
The Octagon forced fighting styles to evolve with unprecedented speed, and efficiency was at a premium. Techniques that were deemed outlandish or ineffective were quickly cast aside while less flashy but operational skills became the bedrock of modern MMA.
However, this latest—and arguably most unexpected—bend in the evolutionary road makes it seem as though some brands of traditional martial arts were dismissed too hastily. Without warning, our sport has perhaps crossed another generational threshold.
Suddenly, little by little, MMA appears to be headed back to the dojo. Methods that were once considered dead on arrival in the Octagon are experiencing a revival.”

What encouraging words from a standard MMA journalist. The prove is there again. Traditional martial art styles have always been valid. There was simply a point in history where Karate, Kung Fu, and Taekwondo styles were unable to keep combat effectiveness due to a lack of venues to fight in and a decrease in the acceptance of fighting for sport. Boxing and other mainstream concepts have always been acceptable to society through the last century, but more serious ideas such as kicking the legs and other parts has been looked down upon. Only in Asia did Muay Thai stay strong and other various kickboxing methods. In Brazil they have a history of Vale Tudo and the lack of understanding of grappling and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu reign supreme for nearly 100 years in Brazil.

Karate and other styles not having to prove themselves in open combat made it easy for shysters and charlatans and other bad things such as mysticism and nonsense to invade the arts. Moves increased this concept with all of the wild Kung Fu and Ninja films in the 70’s and 80’s that allowed martial arts teachers to hide in the shadows of mysteriousness and what is foreign and unknown. Of course many true masters kept the true traditional arts alive and strong (People like Mas Oyama etc.), and traditional techniques always have worked. It is just so many did not know how to make them work and the early UFC battled int he Octagon are a poor example of martial arts masters. That is why BJJ always won as well as wrestling. Now with the knowledge of grappling and how to stuff takedowns the stand up fighters are continuously knocking people out with wrestling and boxing backgrounds. If you did not train your body to kick high and have good balance or understand elusive techniques then he has a serious chance of getting knocked out be experts in a traditional style. Fight Night 82 is an example. I believe to be a good fighter and martial artist you should specialize in something and master it. Gone are the days is just power lifting an learning to throw left hook combos and sprawl. You really have to know more and also try and master something. Jack of all trades will no longer be the champions.

I Am Now Training MMA And BJJ In Korea, Kyeoktuki

        Recently a new gym opened up in my neighborhood here in Bucheon, Korea. It is literally about 500 feet away from the outside of my building. There is no reason not to check it out, so I did. I ended up feeling the place out and I signed up. The instructor was cool and all the students were very nice. It is a place that lacks the big stink of ego that seemed to plague every American MMA gym. Koreans have a more respectful attitude in their culture when involved in activities or within an institution. Places such as jobs, schools, your church, your group of friends, or your martial arts gym are full of a lot of respect and calmness. This is not to say that every part of Korea is respectful, because any other international resident living here will tell you that Korea has some of the biggest aholes in the world and people who exude some of the most backward, irrational behavior in all of Asia. Nevertheless, this does not take away the fact that Korea generally has a more respectful and honorable attitude than other places. Especially within the martial arts. It feels as a little of the Taekwondo spirit is left inside MMA here. The Korean Mudo spirit. You can feel it even if there is no Taekwondo in these gyms, unless someone trained in it before; but it is not taught.

        So I felt safe here and had a positive experience. I have trained for a week. I go 2 nights a week for about 5 hour worth of training. It is very good training and even includes 5 rounds of circuit training for body conditioning. I tell you, I am so sore.

        Studying Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is my main goal. To learn fundamentals, obtain a strong ground fighting structure for self defense, and hopefully earn my blue belt at least. The other things I learn at this gym is Muay Thai and MMA, which combined it all together. I am learning some wrestling stuff with the Muay Thai that is going to help me be a better fighter. It has been some very fun training.

        The training is safe so far, no one is hitting full contact and our classes are working strictly for the purpose of getting techniques down. The Korean students, even the big boys, those few giants of Korea you see, are some of the nicest guys and fun to spar with. I even noticed that there is 1 girl training to who is a white belt beginner. It is a safe place.

Here is the link to the gym. It is called Fight Gallery.

What is interesting is that this gym is called “Kyuktooki Garrarri,” if you sound out the Hangul when reading it. So it says, “Fight Gallery.” MMA and Kickboxing here is often referred to either as K1 (As in K-1, the Japanese Kickboxing promotion) by the average Korean, or Kyeoktuki. There was a DVD released a decade ago by Turtle Press called Kyuktooki: Korean Kickboxing and I bought it a few years ago. Many westerners wanted to understand what it meant and if Kyuktooki is a real Korean style of martial arts. Finally, I know the real answer. Kyuktooki, or Kyeoktuki, is not actually a martial arts style, but more of a kind of martial art, or type of martial arts. It basically speaks of free fighting. What Kyeoktuki actually means when literally translated into English is “hit fighting.” Or “striking fighting.” It basically is the term for real Kickboxing as well as used to describe MMA (even though MMA has grappling too). Kyeoktuki is a style of martial arts much the same as MMA is a style of martial arts. However, there are organizations in Korea that claim they teach Kyeoktuki and they have made it their ow style with their own black belt ranks. So there are certain organizational styles of Kyeoktuki, but overally it is not actually a special ancient Korean kicboxing style. Much like the Turtle Press DVD actually says, Kyeoktuki is a mixed style of free fighting that can include anything from Taekwondo, Karate, Muay Thai, Judo, Wrestling etc. All of the rage from Thailand about how Korea is “stealing” their martial art or lying about something are nonsense. Korea is not stealing or claiming to have created anyting. Many Kyeoktuki fighters are Muay Thai stylists. Most are actually. There are also a ton of Taekwondo Kyeoktuki fighters. Kyeoktuki is a general term for a more serious fighting sport, that does not include Olympic Taekwondo since it has such limiting rules and tons of padding.

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Starting over as a white belt is good for any martial artist to learn humility. This is me in my new gi (dobok) and with my new instructor.

        So now I can actually say, “Hey I am training Kyeoktuki in Korea” which is kind of cool, even if it is just MMA. Now when I describe my Taekwondo training and studies in Korea to people here I can just say, “I train in Taekwondo for Kyeoktuki and want to teach Taekwondo for Kyeoktuki and not the Olympics. The average Korean instantly understands what I mean. They are also fascinated to know their native martial art is actually a self defense system when I explain to them that my “boxing” is actually just Taekwondo. They are confused when I throw straight jabs and rights from up above and not from the hip. The average Korean has seriously lost all sense of what Taekwondo started out as because of the Olympics and stupid cornball, Taekwondo dancers everywhere. Also, they see poomsae a lot, but really do not understand the point. Along with the term Kyeoktuki, I mentioned Mudo which is the Korean transliteration of the Japanese term of Budo which is the way of the warrior. Taekwondo is Mudo, and it is Kyeoktuki when taken out of the Olympics context.

        Now about my training in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, it is humbling to start over at a new gym as a white belt. Oh, yes I have done this before in Judo, Boxing, and MMA in America, but yes I am doing it again and it is only going to benefit my martial arts spirit. My goal right now is to gain competent ground skills for real self defense and be able to hold my own if I get taken down in a fight. The other goal I have is to earn my blue belt. After that I will see if I will one day earn a purple belt. Who knows. My instructor is a professional MMA fighter and he is a cool guy. He is a 4 stripe purple belt and he is very calm and kind. He also has a decade of Wrestling/Judo/Muay Thai/Boxing training. He speaks English (Thank God) and he has a warm heart for foreigners. Fight Gallery is a great place for non-Koreans who speak English and it is a welcoming environment. I will give more details of my training in future posts. Stick around and check back from time to time.

        So now I am doing Taekwondo and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu with Muay Thai and MMA on the side. I hope this helps me be a true martial arts master. When I earn my Taekwondo 4th dan this year at the Kukkiwon I want to know that I deserve to be a teacher of the fighting arts.

Jose Aldo Broken Rib From Back Kick And Out Of UFC 189 Is From Stupid Training Practices

        The terrible news of Jose Aldo, the current UFC featherweight champion, receiving a broken rib from his idiot training partner Alcides Nunes who used a back kick in practice sparring that cracked Aldo’s rib is aggravating for fight fans who were given tons of hype of his previously upcoming fight against Conor McGregor. Now Chad Mendes, a boring wrestler is going to take Aldo’s place (uuuugh! Lay and pray fest). The reason for this broken rib is because of the ignorant ways many MMA gyms practice. Their ignorant ideas of “super tough training” seems to always cause injuries all over the MMA world. Even Cane Velasquez the now former UFC heavy weight champion did not even fight for 2 long years because of injuries at his AKA gym.

        This fight was going to be Jose Aldo who is pretty much a puncher and grappler to fight Conor McGregor who is a pretty decent striker who uses boxing and kicks from Taekwondo. McGregor has an ITF Taekwondo background and uses back kicks often and other kicks with his boxing skills. This was going to be an interesting fight. But of course as is common in MMA hyped fights an injury keeps the fans from seeing what they were told they wanted to see from months and months of intense marketing and “bad blood” between the two.

“The biggest featherweight fight ever? NOT ANYMORE!!!!

Now it’s just a unimportant “interim championship” fight…

        The truth is Jose Aldo’s injury should never have happened (obvious) and the fact it did happen only points us to the fact they have idiots at his gym who have no clue how to carefully train with someone and work on techniques with a proper and safe sparring partner. Chael Sonnen recently commented about the situation of Aldo’s injury and his training partner,

You’ve got to have training partners you can trust. I could be sparring with a guy and he forgot his mouthpiece, it wouldn’t matter. I’m not going to loosen his tooth, ever. If he goes with me, he’s going to leave in the same condition that he showed up in. He can trust me. Those are the kind of guys that you want to be working out with.

This is a very true statement that a lot of MMA gyms don’t seem to understand and allow too much ego and meatheaded jock behavior to injure may of their gym members. I know this for a fact from training at an MMA gym before. A friend of mine had his rib cracked from an moronic wrestler with an ego problem who went for a very hard takedown. People get injured all the time at these kinds of gyms. The problem is MMA has adopted the ignorant attitude that many boxing gyms have historically had that a person needs to fight really hard in sparring and get beat up to prove he is tough or man enough to be worthy to teach or given any attention. This nonsense philosophy loses so many potentially good fighters and martial artists that COULD be trained if given proper training. Not all people can just right away fight like a warrior, it has to be trained in them and taught often. People need to slow up and spar slow, work technique, not be hit so hard right away. Over time they can use harder contact. Not everyone is game to go hardcore in sparring and get hit hard. Beginners need to build confidence and bravery over time for that to happen. Then when someone is tough enough to handle it there is seriously no point in sparring all the way with full contact every night, especially if someone is a top athlete who needs to avoid getting hurt before a bout.

Traditional martial arts in my opinion is the best way to train a fighter or any kind of martial artist. There is a step-by-step process and concern for the student is given and they tale safe steps to get where they need to be. If MMA gyms stopped following the boxing theory of “proving your worth” a lot more martial artists could come out of their gyms who would be great fighters and would not want to quit. MMA is also more intense than boxing with kicks, elbows, knees, grappling and submissions. It is way more dangerous than boxing with a lot m,ore kinds of injuries. MMA training needs to be done safely.

Chael Sonnen also said,

Accidents happen. This could have been an accident. But it was a spinning kick to the midsection. That’s a very hard strike to control – it’s the same reason we don’t throw elbows in practice. They’re just too hard to control, and if one gets away, even a light one, it can cut your opponent and he’s going to need stitches. There are some things you just don’t do on a partner; you save it for the heavy bag. I’m very confused as to how this even happened 10 days before a title fight.

I will have to say while I understand his concerns about elbows, his is flat out wrong about the “spinning” back kick. Taekwondo practitioners have trained all kinds of kicks, especially the back kick without too many injuries. It totally possible to practice sparring with the back kick without getting injured. A back kick is not “hard to control” when done by an expert. Is Aldo’s training partner was an expert in Taekwondo he could have easily controlled the power of his back kick. Just because it is a turning kick does not mean its impossible to kick lightly. Anyone who believes it is too hard to control is ignorant about such martial arts techniques. They have no clue what they are talking about. Sure by the average MMA guy who just picked up the back kick from watching a youtube video, or who was a green belt before in Taekwondo as a child will suck at throwing back kicks. He will be awkward, unbalanced, and lack any sort of control. These types of people are simply white belt level at kicking and need to train more. There are a lot of MMA guys who think they are martial arts masters who actually suck and lack control. Jose Aldo should have simply been drilling the back kick and working counters to it. If he did sparring the back kick should be thrown so Aldo could work on maneuvers to either block it or avoid it and counter. Olympic Taekwondo sparring drills are the best for this.

Another important thing to remember is most of the time in Taekwondo they wear a chest protector called the hogu in Korean. Olympic Taekwondo is a full contact sport so their back kicks are the best in the world. ITF Taekwondo has the exact same technique and obviously can be thrown with extreme power too an that is Conor McGregor’s background. ITF may be light contact but they would even prove more that a back kick can be controlled without injuring an opponent. But McGregor is not going to throw it light contact. WTF Olympic sparring drills wold be best with a chest protector pad worn. One can throw with medium contact and also if Aldo would miss his technique and get hit the padded chest protector would save him from a broken rib. He should have been wearing one.

Taekwondo coaches, instructors and more should be sought out by MMA gyms to make sure their fighters are being protected and given great drills for working on various kicks that Taekwondo is the best at. MMA gyms need less out dated training methods, more safety, more martial arts experts that specialize in systems and not just some dude who wrestled in high school and took a few boxing lessons. The fact Taekwondo coaches are still shunned by most MMA gyms shows that while MMA in top level organizations are increasingly showing Taekwondo techniques as extremely dangerous, brutal, and fight enders with various fighters using them, the average MMA gym and average MMA culture are still in the “Taekwondo sucks” phase of the late 90’s and early 00’s that has been proven as an ignorant view. More traditional martial arts should be embraced, instructors given jobs, safer training methods with logical progression, and traditional martial arts values of losing your ego in the dojang and a moral code to go with your training should be accepted in the MMA world. Jose Aldo should not have been injured and his training partner should be kicked out of the gym for being an idiot or at least disciplined. All of this could have been avoided if the coaches and staff at Aldo’s gym weren’t clueless about Taekwondo.

Taekwondo Provides Techniques For A Deadly MMA Arsenal

        I always have to list when a Taekwondo technique worked in an MMA fight just to prove to the TKD-haters and naysayers that want to believe that Taekwondo sucks are wrong. Shawn Jordan hook kicked Derrick Lewis in the face and knocked him down and dazed him and finished him with punches to knock him out for the win.

        Taekwondo kicks can be used by fat heavy weight guys who do not have 6 pack abs to full effect and I love it! You do not have to have the stereotypical “Oympic Taekwondo body” to use Taekwondo in brutal fashion and kick butt.

        The way he threw the kick was the best way for causing more damage. Look closely at his heel hitting right on the jaw. An even better place he could have kicked is the temple on the side of the head. The hook kick can whip hard and cause the heel to dig into the face and head of an opponent or attacker. This is how you knock someone out. The hook kick also can appear to be a low kick towards the leg but instantly pops up around to the face. It is tricky and with all of the leg kicking MMA guys do it is a confusing kick and when done spontaneously as a counter is hard to see coming!

        Taekwondo provide brutal and dynamic kicks that many other martial arts under utilize or simply do not use at all. Taekwondo kicks are supposed to be thrown non-telegraphically unlike many Muay Thai kicks which are slower with the leg pump or switch of the feet before throwing just telling your opponent, “Hey I am NOW going to use this kick toward you right now.” So using Taekwondo can sometimes overrule other striking styles.

If Anderson Silva, The GOAT of MMA, Embraces Taekwondo Then That Means Taekwondo Does Not Suck And Is A Legitimate Fighting Art

        Anderson Silva has recently made it known that he has a desire to compete in the next Olympics in the sport of Taekwondo Sparring. The Brazilian Taekwondo Confederation (WTF member of Brazil) posted on their website (in Portuguese) that Silva desires to compete in the next Olympics in 2016. He says that he has a passion to represent Brazil and that the Olympics are the dream of every high performance athlete.

        The BTC in the past has given 5th degree black belt status to Anderson Silva already. I believe it is honorary rank. I am not sure if Silva is certified by the Kukkiwon as a black belt. He may be, but I could never find anything to confirm this. If he already is ranked in the Kukkiwon then he can compete in WTF tournaments and also in the Olympics. If he does not have rank yet then he has to test and perform every poomsae to pass. I would love to see Anderson Silva performing poomsae it would be interesting. He also has to wear a dobok and black belt with pads (chest gear and head gear as well).

        What he should do is compete in very high level tournaments like nationals or other world tournaments to get himself prepared to Taekwondo sport. I think that it is very interesting that a “no holds barred” MMA fighter wants to compete in a martial art that almost every single MMA/UFC fanboy and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu bandwagon jumper has repeatedly said sucks over and over for the last 20 years. That Taekwondo is a joke, that Taekwondo does not work in a real fight, that Taekwondo is a stupid sport. Well if the GOAT of the UFC and MMA says Taekwondo is a sport good enough for him to compete, that Taekwondo is a legitimate martial art then that means it is.

        Yes, Silva has recent performance enhancing drug issues, but I hope it gets resolved and he is allowed to compete in Taekwondo. It will be interesting to see how he moves, how he kicks, and how he will not punch the face and only the chest gear. I look forward to training videos and more. Will he be able to transition out of MMA, will he do well against lifelong sport Taekwondo sparring experts? This is exciting! There is a reason why Taekwondo is an Olympic level athletic endeavor.

The Fight Doctor Sensei Takuya Futaesaku

        Several years ago I randomly found a cool YouTube channel of a Karate master who is also a Physical Therapy doctor. I first saw a video of a Japanese female fighter doing a slow kicking exercise. His videos are full of various martial artists, most of them professional fighters of K-1 and MMA and other sports such as Kyokushin Karate, and even Olympic Taekwondo athletes; all of them are doing various martial arts style physical therapy. It is an interesting channel. His name is Dr. Takuya Fitaesaku and he is the founder of Society of Fighting Medicine. His channel name on YouTube is “sunliveorio.” So check it out.

I wanted to get an interview with him, and he agreed to do it, but had second thoughts because of English language issues, as well as he is a very, very busy doctor and Karate teacher traveling doing so many seminars and appointments that translation would take a long time. So he changed his mind and did not want to answer all of my questions. He was very polite and nice to talk to even so.

        Apparently he is famous in Japan for being the doctor at ringside for many fights such as K-1 Kickboxing and Japanese MMA promotions. He is not only a high ranking Karate black belt in 2 styles, but a real medical doctor with a degree from medical school. I think he has valuable information on injury prevention, healing of injuries and strengthening, and all around safety in practice of martial arts. He is big on Karate but he is a overal general martial arts and combat sports enthusiast and respects it all. He is a Karate master of Yoshukai and Kyokushin Karate styles. He also invented an awesome striking bag which is a thin cylinder on a chain that works great for fast kicking, punching, and avoiding simulated strikes toward you called the “KO Bag.” It allows you to move around more freely than a standard, large heavy bag. Dr. Futaesaku is a Karate genius!

There are other videos showing all kinds of punching drills and also connected 2 of these KO Bags together as well as tying on 2 striking pads on the bottom to simulate multiple legs kicking at you. It looks like an incredibly fun cardio workout.

It can get crazier and crazier depending on what you connect to it! You can order one and have it shipped to you. He also sells really cool shirts that he designed that say “No Karate, No Life” on them for diehard karateka to wear. He always is wearing one of these shirts as he never wears a gi top or black belt in any of his videos.

         “Dr. F” as he is known also uploads “pay for” video seminars. All of his videos on YouTube have pretty much been in Japanese, but he has since started to upload English language videos. His seminars are available by purchase online via instant video streaming/download at the following link: http://necfru.jp/video?id=3993. You can view a 3 minute sample there and if you want more you can pay for it and get the entire video.

He trains any martial arts style and there are videos of Kickboxers, Muay Thai fighters, Full Contact Karate fighters, and Olympic Taekwondo fighters who all had training and physical therapy teachings learned by Dr. F.

Another random thing is, I am not sure, but I believe that he also gives physical therapy to Japanese rock singers and pop artists. Since the videos are in Japanese I am not exactly sure what is going on except he is also famous with some musicians. Check out his channel.

Interview With Master In Choul Jeong

        In Choul Jeong is a great Taekwondo master of our day who has been very influential with advancing Taekwondo techniques. He is on the education committee in the Kukkiwon. He is the author of Hand Techniques of Taekwondo for Actual Fighting written for the Korean Taekwondo Association (KTA). I found out about master Jeong through YouTube last year when I was looking up hand techniques for real Taekwondo fighting. I was looking up videos for Taekwondo and self defense. I stumbled upon this video:

When I saw that I was impressed and felt really encouraged to keep training hand techniques in Taekwondo. He even emphasizes use of the kwon go (Korean translation of the Japanese term makiwara, which is the board with rope tied around it used for the hitting of the fist) for hand conditioning, something Taekwondo people have forgotten which used to be one of the essential training tools in the old days. Now days it seems only karateka use it while taekwondoin (who came from Karate and used to use it) are busy training for tournament sparring without much use of hands.

Master Jeong also makes videos showing applications for poomsae. He shows what the movements mean and why you are training them, and how they relate to self defense. He keeps putting out one awesome video after another. I think more people need to know about his videos and subscribe to his channel. It is awesome to see Korean Taekwondo masters training for the purpose of fighting and self defense and not only doing demo’s or Taekwondo-dance which seems to be 99% of the videos you see online today.

I was given the opportunity by master Jeong to do an interview with him so he could tell us all more about his training background and martial arts philosophy! If you have not checked Master Jeong’s YouTube channel please do so! Make sure to like his videos and subscribe to his channel!

Enjoy the interview:

WHITE DRAGON: What’s your name? Where were you born? Please introduce yourself.

 MASTER JEONG: My name is In Choul Jeong, but my Face book page’s name is “Taekwondo master Jeong In Choul” (Korean style).  I was born in Seoul, South Korea. I teach Taekwondo to foreign people at the World Taekwondo Culture Expo, World Youth Taekwondo Camp and at my dojang.  Nice to speak to you all.

WHITE DRAGON: How did you get involved in martial arts and how old were you? What made you want to start training? Please list your training history and be as specific as possible. Who were your instructors in the past? Any notable characters?

MASTER JEONG: You are asking me many things at once! Haha! I started training Taekwondo at 6 years old. My father was a Grandmaster and so his Dojang was my playground. His name is “Soon Kyu Jeong”and he is at the level of 9th dan. He is a former vice president of Odokwan and he taught many students. One of them is Grandmaster Hwang (Kukkiwon Director, Instructor). Master Hwang is also my master. I think I am a lucky guy because I’ve gotten chances to learn from many great teachers: Grandmaster In Sik Hwang, Grandmaster Ik Pil Kang (World Champion at poomsae), Grandmaster Jae Ro Ahn (President of Cheongjihjoe), as well as many teachers in other martial arts. They are all my masters in my life.

3rd place poomsae division at World Hanmadang, standing with his father Master Soon Kyu Jeong

WHITE DRAGON: What are your ranks, certifications, or titles in martial arts? Do you have tournament titles?

MASTER JEONG: Taekwondo 6th Dan Kukkiwon

Kendo – 5th dan 

Kyungho Moosool (martial art for body guards) – 5th dan

Member of Kukkiwon Education Committee

Instructor of World Taekwondo Culture Expo

Instructor of World Youth Taekwondo Camp

Author of Hand Techniques of Taekwondo for Actual Fighting (KTA, ANIBIG,2013)

Author of Textbook for Kukkiwon Instructors (WTA, 2014)

International poomsae competition held during the Korean Open, 1st place

Taekwondo poomsae competition held on the honor of KTA president, 1st place in senior department

Taekwondo poomsae competition held on the honor of KITF president, 2nd place 

Besides Taekwondo, I have trained in Boxing, Muay Thai, Kendo, Kyungho Moosool,etc..

Master Jeong with foreign students

WHITE DRAGON: What is Kyungho Moosool and who is allowed to learn it? What techniques and concepts does it entail?

MASTER JEONG: Kyungho Moosool is a Korean martial art for body guards. It trains a person to protect VIP’s. I do not teach this even though I am 5th dan, but it was very helpful to study real fight Taekwondo. The president of Kyngho Moosol is named Jae Sool Byun. He was my father’s student and he has earned over 20 dan ranks from many styles of martial arts. He is the president of the Korean Special Kyungho Moosool Association in Korea. I received my certification in 2004. If someone wants to become a professional body guard he can apply to this program, but he should hold a rank of at least 3rd dan in some other martial art style before he will even be considered. There are many techniques and systems about defensive automobile driving, tactical firearms, and weapons disarms training in that program. They teach the principle of body guarding and all that it entails to protect a VIP. 

WHITE DRAGON: What is Cheonjihoe?

MASTER JEONG: One of the top poomsae teams in Korea. Master Ik Pil Kang was 1st president of Cheongjihoe, and I learned poomsae from him. The word means “the people who have pure minds.” 

WHITE DRAGON: Have you ever had to use Taekwondo in a real life fight or self defense situation? Have you ever been given a challenge by someone who wanted to fight you? If so how did you deal with it?

 MASTER JEONG: Yes, When I was a boy, I had so many fights and used skills of Taekwondo (It’s such a shame, I was so childish). Apchagi (front kick) to the stomach is a very useful skill and sometimes I used dwit chagi (back kick) to finish an aggressive enemy. When I was in my 20’s, I worked as a manager in my uncle’s night club. There were so many fights especially at Friday night. I usually tried to break up the fights and some guys tried to punch me. But I parried all their punches with steps and blocked the attacks with Taekwondo skills. After that I suppressed them easily. Actually, small and fast action is very important in a real fight situation, not fancy action.

WHITE DRAGON: What is your opinion on the modern state of Taekwondo? Many feel that Taekwondo has lost much of its combative nature these days. Is this true?

MASTER JEONG:  Yes it is. I want to answer with this famous quote, “You win some, you lose some.” Boxers can’t use kicks in a boxing match, so their punching techniques have been developed brilliantly and skillful. Likewise, we as Taekwondo competitors can’t punch in the face in a Taekwondo match, so the kicking techniques of Taekwondo are the best they have ever been now because they have been developed over time just as boxing developed punches in their sport. 

However, while we’ve developed great kicks because of sport, many of us have unfortunately lost the development of hand techniques. Sadly, many of us don’t train the hand techniques of Taekwondo anymore which causes many people feel think that Taekwondo is just a sport and is not effective for self defense.

But I want to say “The essence of Taekwondo” is a martial art for actual fighting. I will quote from my book Hand Techniques of Taekwondo for Actual Fighting (KTA, ANIBIG,2013):

The 1st and 2nd class Master Course Textbook (for Kukkiwon Taekwondo Master Training Course attendees) says the same thing – ‘Taekwondo is a martial art for knocking down enemies.’ (Kukkiwon Master Course Textbook). This is very important and we should remember this.

Hand Techniques Of Taekwondo For Actual Fighting book

The number of hand Technique is larger than the number of kicking in Taekwondo, nevertheless we barely use hand techniques in sparring training or a match. So I have intensely studied the techniques of Taekwondo for actual fighting and have written the book Hand Techniques of Taekwondo for Actual Fighting (KTA, ANIBIG,2013) with great masters Jaeyoung Um and Jae Ro Ahn. I have translated the book into English and you may be able to buy it online in a few months. (Special thanks to Master Andy Jeffries for supervising). Search for it on Amazon and other book outlets in the near future. 

Demonstrating accurate poomsae at a clinic for foreign students

WHITE DRAGON:  What is your opinion on the International Taekwondo Federation (ITF)?

MASTER JEONG: I respect Grand master “Choi Hong Hi” the founder of ITF. They  use  punches  to  the  face  in  competition  sparring and  they have been trying to keep Taekwondo as a martial art. I think that’s good.

WHITE DRAGON: It is said that martial arts change people’s lives. In what way has martial arts training influenced your life? What can it do for other people?

MASTER JEONG: People learn patience, concentration, courtesy, and manners while training Taekwondo. And so did I. The real power of education is changing a person. Not only in terms of combative martial arts, but also in terms of personal edification. Taekwondo is a very powerful martial art.

 WHITE DRAGON: What is your opinion of the “Taekwondo-dance trend”? The Korean Tigers really promote it and have made it popular all over the world. I would like to know your thoughts on that.

MASTER JEONG: I think of it positively and I like K-Tigers team. But I think balance and sequence are very important. If some masters teach Taekwon-dance to a white belt student, it is not proper. If someone trains Taekwon-dance over 30 minutes in a one hour training session, this is not proper also.

Kendo master

WHITE DRAGON: What is your opinion of mixed martial arts, and how does Taekwondo today fit in the world wide trend of MMA? Is MMA something to embrace as a Taekwondoin? Do you have any favorite fighters in the world of MMA or Kickboxing?

MASTER JEONG: I really like MMA. My favorite fighter is Ronda Rousey. Many MMA fighters and kickboxers are learning Taekwondo’s kicks and trying to apply it to their game. I am very proud of it. And I think Taekwondo masters should learn the skills of other martial arts and study them for upgrading. To develop something, we need flexibility, not a fixed idea, so I think “embrace” is an excellent word. Sometimes I do free sparring with MMA fighters or Kickboxers here and there. It is very helpful to understand more about martial arts.

Boxing practice

WHITE DRAGON: How important is poomsae practice to you and your philosophy?

MASTER JEONG: I learn the principles of body movement from poomsae, and I have been trying to apply the skills of poomsae to a real life situation. You can find my videos on YouTube and Facebook (search “Master Jeong In Choul”) demonstrating poomsae applications and scenario based self defense training with the movements found in Taekwondo forms. I believe that people will find the essence of Taekwondo in poomsae.

Taekwondo fit!

 

WHITE DRAGON: Do you enjoy Olympic Taekwondo sparring?

MASTER JEONG: Yes I do. There is an advantage in Olympic style techniques to learn and we should not ignore it. I think that a real master should be skilled with both parts (poomsae and kyorugi) and should be able to apply poomsae into actual fighting. When I was in elementary school I had won a few medals from national competition. I also did sparring in tournaments all the time when I was a middle school student. Unfortunately, my parents did not agree that I should be an athlete and instead made me focus on studying in high school. So my Taekwondo focus turned towards poomsae training and hoshinsool study. Then in college I trained sparring and usually competed. I was a sparring champion in the university union division. I still enjoy sparring with various people here and there from time to time. I just never compete anymore and focus on self defense concepts and poomsae applications.

WHITE DRAGON: Do you have any final shout outs, statements, or feelings to express? If so feel free to mention them!

MASTER JEONG: It was my pleasure to do this interview, thank you for asking me to do it! 

WHITE DRAGON: I appreciate the chance to interview you thank you!

MASTER JEONG: You’re welcome! Good bye!

*For more information on Master Jeong In Chul follow his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Jeonginchoul

and subscribe to his YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCy-Jg_befA1wq6eWnTSVz2Q

 Be sure to buy his book Hand Techniques of Taekwondo for Actual Fighting (KTA, ANIBIG,2013). It comes out in English this year! Look for it on Amazon! 

 

Street Beefs, Nothin’ Like A Redneck Fight Party

*This post has been updated as of August 11th 2015 to currently reflect the author’s view

        Here is a video of 4 guys fighting in a backyard in Virginia. This is a 2 on 2 fight. Apparently, they had beef with each other: 2 brothers against 2 cousins. I thought this fight was hilarious and pretty entertaining. This is some wild stuff. There is nothing like a redneck party!

This YouTube channel is called “Street Beefs,” and is dedicated to local people who have disputes they want to settle with a little good ol’ fashioned violence. I followed this channel for awhile including their facebook page. But one wonders if these “beefs” are real, and if they are real how “serious” they are. The owner of this channel, who goes by the nickname Scareface (or just Face) claims these fights are disputes that have gotten past the point of reconciliation and can only be settled through a down and out fight. According to the owner of this YouTube channel, a former youth-competitive-boxer who claims that as a teenager and young-in he fought in over 40 boxing matches. His backyard is used to allow people to fight out their differences and settle disputes to keep people from actual street fights. It is a way for angry people who are upset at one another to let off their steam. “Face” claims that his backyard saves people from actually killing each other on the streets and that much of these disputes could lead to actual gunfights. He says this all the time, but one will wonder if this is actually true or he is embellishing things. In the past he titled his videos with fake titles mentioning broken arms or legs on the youtube video which he admitted that he did just to get people to click on it. So such embellishments or lies about the fights themselves show that he is not that honest about what is going on in his backyard. Possibly some of the fights are tiny little argument, but it seems they serve more of a way for his channel to get popular, for him to get popular, to make adsense money, and give the fighters a little attention on the internet. There is no real evidence to prove these fights are 100% deadly serious to where each fighter may actually want to murder the other. And if they did it would seem that a backyard fight wouldn’t squash th dispute either and after the fight the loser would still get a gun and shoot the other person.

Another thing about the Street Beefs channel owner is that he is an ex-con, a cop hater (serious, serious, serious cop hater), a far left extremist who despises the Confederate flag and hates republicans. I guess being an ex-con makes him a little biased and someone who will ignore criminal, thug behavior and claim cops are all out to kill black people. Other than that the dude seems nice, but noooo don’t you EVER disagree with his ridiculous criminal ideology about cops and white people. You will get shunned or he will want to fight you in his backyard. There is no talking sense or intellectual discourse, this guy is from DA STREETZ YALL and doin’ it to save the kids from murdering each other. I guess…the concept is nice and interesting and I could agree with it, but I doubt it is as serious as he makes it.

The fights are controlled with a referee and certain rules in place. They seem to mostly use MMA rules, except in the case of the above video with multiple guys fighting. There are people there to make sure no one gets seriously hurt, yet I am sure it is still pretty darn dangerous. Let’s hope they have properly trained medical people on hand in case something serious happens. I doubt they do though, this is some redneck, ghetto stuff. At least they have gloves and mouth pieces, yet it seems in some videos some fighters throw out their mouth guard and keep fighting. So apparently it is an option.

I kind of like the idea of people fighting it out to settle a dispute. I think it is a lot more healthy than shooting each other or stabbing someone on the street, or fighting it out with no ref to break it up. It is a fact of life people get angry and pissed off sometimes and I find combat is a good way to relieve such rage and let it out. Hopefully the fighters respect one another after the fights and their so called “beef” is solved. It is also noticeable in various videos that these fights are bringing together many ethnic groups, cultural backgrounds and ideologies into one backyard. This is a positive thing. Yet, not so positive in the fact the guy will get butthurt if you tell them to get martial arts training to b safer, or learn MMA, and also if you actually respect cops and think they are mostly good. That is the cardinal sin right there. Also, criminal thugs are always okay unless of course one happens to be a nazi. That is the most intolerable evil, that someone is a skinhead who commits crimes VS someone who is not a skinhead or is black and commits crimes. So somehow the racists crimes are worse than the other guys crimes etc. There was a time he posted a video on his own Facebook page showing the beginning of a sexual assault in a prison where a black prisoner attacks a white prisoner with a shaved head who then orders him to take off his clothes so he can rape him. He was very positive about the thug who happened to be black who was attacking the white guy in the prison. This shows you his way of thinking. If you can tolerate that or hate cops sure join his group, but for me I cannot be associated with criminal culture and cop haters who seem to be very biased against white people who happened to be in authority, such as police, as well as gives terrible training advice such as not being able to use a speed bag properly (you would think after boxing as a youth he wuld have known his way of punching a speed bag makes absolutely no sense and is just plain wrong. It is calld a speed bag for a reason, not a slow bag…) and he hates people who tell them to train in MMA. I can understand the latter, as MMA onlyists are incredibly pretentious and people have the right to fight in their backyard and have some fun, but it is the anti-proper training and cop hating attitude that turns me off.

Watching the videos it is obvious hardly any of the people fighting are skilled in any martial art yet somehow these videos are still highly entertaining. The fights seem to last for 1 minute rounds, or possible 1 and a half minute rounds. There is always action most of the time as untrained people tend to spazz out. A few of the fighters may have a limited amount of martial arts or boxing training but not a lot. To see some people with limited martial arts skill watch the following 1 on 1 fight:

I thought I would discuss the idea of backyard fights and the idea of fighting to solve arguments for society. Do you believe that such “non-lethal” duels are healthy for society? Of course no one in these videos are going to kill one another like in the old days of sword or gun duels from the Victorian era and before that (at least I do not believe any of these “beefs” are as serious as “Face” makes them out to be as I believe he is embellishing this to get attention. Nonetheless, it seems like a positive thing to be able to challenge someone to a fist fight duel in a backyard. If it keeps poeple from shooting each other or jumping one another outside with absolutely no rules and chances of serious injury it seems like it is a positive thing. I would suggest a rule change of mandatory safety gear such as headgear (at least sometimes for people who fight a lot), groin cups, and mouth pieces. I would also suggest the fighters get training before they fight, and warm up before the fight to avoid more injuries. Either way the channel offers a lot of hilarious and entertaining fights.

What is your all opinions about such fights? Is it right or wrong? Does fighting keep society healthy? Discuss in the comments below!