Posts Tagged ‘south korea’

I Angered General Choi’s Grand Daughter And A Bunch of ITFer’s

        Just a couple of days ago my blog got a lot of traffic from ITF people who are upset at my article about General Choi’s Juche communist sympathies. Jasmine Choi, the late grandmaster general Choi’s granddaughter also posted a comment in sheer anger with many insults about my character. Her and several ITF masters posted a lot of comments and are still doing it if you want to check that post out and read the fun.

This is what Jasmine Choi posted on my article in the comments section:

Wow. Just wow. I cannot believe the garbage I’m reading. You are extremely uneducated about ITF and about General Choi. Imbeciles like you should need to concentrate on whatever “art” you are doing and stop obsessing about someone that is deceased. And you stating General Choi holding hands with Kim Jung Il is ABSURD!!!!!!!! Maybe you need your eyes checked or you’re really that delusional clearly they are not holding hands. Get a life and continue training whatever art you practice I saw the photo of you,you look like I would be able to beat you in sparring. Not sure if you were bullied in highschool but you definitely have small man syndrome. In the martial art as a whole we address other Grandmasters and Masters either by Grandmaster,Master,etc.. or at LEAST Mr whether they are your enemy or not. It’s standard protocol. You have no respect and are spreading this nonsense to guilable readers. Such a lengthy garbage article you must have a lot of time on your hands. Who are you anyway??? Who gives you the right to write this slandering article?! Also,if someone has a photo standing beside someone means they are best friends?!? Politicians that are enemies take photos together so what?! You are extremely juvenile and I’m convinced you are a pink belt of whatever martial art you are taking up. Let my grandfather rest in piece you disrespectful little keyboard warrior. (sic)

With this happening I feel the need to further clarify my personal stance on Choi Hong Hi and the International Taekwon-Do Federation. I do not recant anything I said in previous posts, but I will further clarify my beliefs briefly. I think that if I make statements about what I believe to be historical facts and truth people who do not agree need to address them civilly with me instead of insults. All the ITF and Jasmine Choi did was insult me with name calling and straw man arguments. They did not once address the claims I made. Also they deny that in one photo General Choi is holding hands with Kim Jung Il. I personally see them holding hands in the photo. Either that or they are standing extra close! Either way it is obvious General Choi supported North Korea and did not have a problem with Kim Jung Il.

The reason I started this blog was because I dedicated my life to Taekwondo training and worked so hard to get where I am today. I love Taekwondo and I am tired of seeing it become weak and I also hate seeing it insulted by ignorant masses. Taekwondo is the butt of almost every martial art joke by so many styles of martial arts. Within Taekwondo there is a war with ITF and people who train in WTF/Kukkiwon style. Yes, maybe the heads f ITF and Kukkiwon have diplomatic meetings but the culture inside ITF and its practitioners so extremely harsh to the Kukkiwon, WTF, South Korea and practitioners of Kukki-Taekwondo. This is annoying and for decades ITF people have constantly bad mouthed South Korea, WTF and Kukkiwon and claim people who train in our style are not true fighters or real martial artists. That all we do is a sport. ITF has spouted so many logical fallacies and insults about our martial art it is time someone like me defends it and fights back not pulling any punches. The ITF can disrespect so much about Taekwondo people while claiming their Taekwon-Do is the only truth, yet they cannot receive equal and just criticism. They can dish it out but cannot take it. They are overly sensitive. WTF and Kukki stylists have taken so much trash we have only developed way thicker skin. This is something people like Jasmine Choi and ITF followers need as well. She and her followers will insult me and claim I am not respectful enough to be a master yet she herself is insulting and being respectful on my blog. She has posted a bunch of name calling insults to me and wrongful judgments about my character. Yet she is the daughter of a master and acts this way and claims I should not be a master? This is hypocritical.

I assumed she must have been an ITF master ranked practitioner but according to her Facebook page on various comments on some of her photos it is stated that she does not actually train in Taekwon-Do and has not for over 20 years. She does aerobics or something. So she is not at all a master of martial arts yet she wants to lecture people about being a master. According to ITF you are only a master at 6th or 7th dan I believe and that takes a long time. She is only 35 years old and has not trained for 20 years. That means she had to have quit training as a teenager. No way she is a master of Taekwon-Do or any martial art. Her sole authority lays on her being a member of the Choi family. That is not impressive.

The ITF has always vehemently opposed the Kukkiwon yet time and time again the KTA and Kukkiwon give them a voice and want to meet and create some kind of diplomacy. It never works out. Nothing seems to appease ITF. We don’t need ecumenical attitudes anymore. Just be separate and do our own thing.

Now we have MMA onlyists who think all traditional martial arts sucks especially Taekwondo bad mouthing our martial art. I try my best to defend Taekwondo as a true fighting art that is not only good for self defense, but capable in MMA competition. But to do it honestly I have to also criticize all mcdojang groups and even the wrong things I see the Kukkiwon do from time to time. This blog does not only attack the ITF. In fact ITF posts are not the majority of what I post on my blog. I spend more time criticizing other mcdojang organizations. I also openly criticize the Kukkiwon when it does things I think are ridicuous. Especially Taekwondo dancing and other nonsense. I have always wanted to promote Taekwondo as a martial art, a real fighting system that we can be proud of training in without feeling embarrassed to admit it. Mcdojangism needs to stop. I did not spend over 20 years of my life wasting my time in a dance style or something that cannot save my life if it is threatened. I trained hard in Taekwondo fighting to stand up against bullies and other types of threats. Kukki-Taekwondo has only made me strong both physically and mentally. It works! It is a true martial art. A true fighting art.

With that being said, this is what I believe about General Choi. Take it or leave it!

General Choi was one of the founders of Taekwondo. He was very influential in the early stages especially on the name of Taekwondo. It is debatable if he came up with the name by himself or he simply used a suggested name by one of his associates who brought it up. No matter, he is the one who promoted the name Taekwondo and if it was not for this we would not be training in a martial art with this name. The KTA changed the name from Taekwondo to Tae Soo Do and General Choi influenced them to change it back. I thank him for this as Taekwondo is the best name for our martial art. On the other hand Choi later emphasized the name has to be spelled in English as “Taekwon-Do” which has no grammatical purpose and has nothing to do with original Korean language. Hangul has no hyphens and it is not necessary to translate into English. He changed the spelling to simply differentiate his style as something other than what the KTA and Kukkiwon were doing.

General Choi deserves credit where it is due and he deserves acknowledgement as a historic Taekwondo figure. He heavily promoted kwan unification with other founders and wanted to promote a truly Korean martial art. That is the only respect I can give him.

General Choi had the intention of what the Kukkiwon says is “a power man.” He wanted full control with no question of the KTA. This is why the KTA masters asked him to resign and forced him to step down. He had the attitude of a dictator within the KTA and had a huge ego. The other kwan leaders did not like this nor should they have.

General Choi did sympathize with Juche philosophy (which is North Korean communism) as he named a form with that name. He moved to North Korea and died there. He is buried there and given high honor by North Korea. I think this is wrong and the ITF should openly declare what Kim Jung Eun is doing is wrong. Because of the Kim dynasty millions of North Koreans starved to death and many South Koreans were murdered and many soldiers both South Korean and Americans died fighting this evil. Now we have constant nuclear threats by a crazed lunatic in North Korea, and the ITF simply wants to be diplomatic and kind to them and allow North Korean ITF to come to various countries (including USA) to do demonstrations. Screw that! How can ITF justify Choi going to North Korea to teach them martial arts, essentially teaching their soldiers how to fight better which will in turn be used to kill defectors in North Korea, and South Korean and US soldiers if there is another fight. How is this okay? Explain it Jasmine Choi and explain it ITF! Was it really to unify both Korea’s in peace by teaching them killing techniques? How so? How is this a peace mission and not a slight at South Korea?

General Choi was a 2 star general when he was president of KTA but he was not a martial arts master. There is no evidence to support he had a master rank in Japanese Karate under Funikoshi. The only rank people can argue for is up to 2nd dan, yet there is not sufficient evidence to support he has a black belt when he was trying to run the KTA. The official Kukkiwon stance that I learned while in Korea taking their course is that Choi was in fact not actually a black belt and instead self trained without a dojo. He was given an honorary 4th dan black belt by Duk Sung Son of the Chungdokwan. That means he was given an honorary rank and not a skilled and tested rank through an actual promotion test. Duk Sung Son later recanted that and openly wrote in a news paper that he revoked Choi’s 4th dan because he was upset at Choi’s attitude and Choi literally demanded he be given a 5th dan rank. So Choi was not happy with honorary 4th dan and demanded even more rank. That is ego. So as he started the ITF he had no real rank by a legitimate grandmaster to fall back on such as Funikoshi like other founders of Taekwondo. Most of the other founders of Taekwondo who are usually ignored by ITF members when giving credit to people actually were legitimate martial arts masters and had 4th and 5th degree black belts. Some also studied for may years Chinese martial arts and were masters of Kung Fu styles. Choi did not have such skills or any ranks. Choi came up with a name, but skill and technique-wise he did not create Taekwondo.

ITF is not the only true organization of Taekwondo. It is simply an organization of another style of martial arts apart from Korea. The Korean government recognizes Kukki-Taekwondo as their national martial art much like Japan’s government officially recognized Japanese Karate such as Shotokan and others as official Japanese martial arts. Black belts have always been recognized and affirmed by the government of the country the martial arts were founded in. Going back to Japanese Karate all the way to Korean Taekwondo, the black belt certifications have always been government recognized. It is a very important thing and the KTA was (and Kukkiwon now is) officially recognized by the Korean government. ITF is not. ITF is recognized by Canada’s government making it a Canadian organization. Later North Korea recognizes it.

I do not think Choi completely sucked at martial arts. Sure he had skills but he was not good enough to found a martial art style when he did. The ITF does have some legitimate martial arts techniques such as basic kicks and punches etc. but I do not think their forms were put together well and Choi creating the sine-wave shows he really did not understand proper physics or actual combat very well. The other masters of various kwans actually were real fighters and knew combat. Even so I personally do practice some ITF forms such as Hwa Rang and a few others I like. I also understand that the KTA in early promotion tests accepted a couple of Choi’s tul as testable material for rank. Historic Taekwondo forms are always something I am interested in learning.

ITF does have some good fighters. For instace Coner McGregor has an ITF background and is a black belt and uses ITF style Taekwon-Do techniques in the UFC. Many of the techniques are also similar to Kukki-Taekwondo techniques. So I may not personally like the ITF but I do not deny some of their people are good at fighting or that some of their techniques can work. I have always maintained this position ever since I started this blog. Yet, Kukki/WTF has had people like Anderson Silva (one of the best fighters of all time in MMA) with training history and black belt ranks.

I do not think Taekwondo needs to be ecumenical and support all of the organizations. I think separation is best. ITF can do its own thing and stay out of our business and we can do the same to them. But they should stop acting like they are the sole truth of Taekwondo and should only claim they are their own style.

I will not support ITF because of its historic ties to North Korea and Juche communism. My article has all the information on that and anyone can read it.

If the ITF and people like Jasmine Choi can only name call, ridicule, straw man, and use various other logical fallacies to argue their case then that is pathetic and only shows ITF acts like a cult and needs to chill out. If it wasn’t for her being related to General Choi she would be just another woman who used to train as a teenager. There are many people like that. Her being related to General Choi does not prove her correct or true. She needs to argue logically and politely with me if she wants to debate something. That goes for all ITF people who disagree with me. Don’t be a hypocrite and say I am disrespectful therefore I am not a true Taekwondo master yet do the same thing to me while claiming to be an important Taekwondo figure.

My blog may be extremely critical about the ITF (something I never hide), but it is also very critical of things that the Kukkiwon does and WTF and other groups as well. I do not refrain from expressing my opinion about Taekwondo and martial arts no matter my allegiance. I am Kukki-Taekwondo and ranked as a master and proud of it. I fully believe Kukkiwon is the true Korean Taekwondo organization, but yet I will not refrain from often criticizing them for things I don’t agree with that they do (and there are plenty!).

The ITF has yet to prove me wrong about my claims on General Choi’s communist sympathy.

Again, I will declare General Choi Hong Hi, 2 star general, first president of the KTA and “namer” of the martial art of Taekwondo, deserves credit as one of the founders of Taekwondo and promotion of Korean martial arts. But that is all. Nothing else he did benefited our martial art but instead himself and the ITF.

 

I Passed My 4th Dan Test In Korea

        I am proud to announce that I passed my 4th dan test in Korea. It was a great experience and such a relief! Finally after nearly 21 years I am a 4th dan black belt, master level, in Taekwondo. Master Jeong helped me register for this and drove me to the location to test. I am so thankful for him!

        The test is split up into 4 sections; 5 if you count basic motions as separate from poomsae. The longest part of the test is waiting for your time to perform as you sit there. Once you start the actual test it is very fast and only lasts about 30 minutes. It is rapid pace and you end up doing everything immediately. How it works is they separate everyone into groups. About 10 people in each group. Once they call your group you line up and perform.

        First, we did some basic motions and kicks back and fourth. They call all of the words out in Korean and expect you to know what they want you to do. So we did various blocks and a few strikes. Then we did 3 kicks. Only front kick, round kick and side kick That was it. After the basics they command you to do poomsae and they have 2 forms chosen. Everyone the entire test does the exact same motions and poomsae. Nothing is different from anyone else. This time they had us perform Keumgang and Taebaek. Lower dan levels had to do Koryo instead of Taebaek. But for us higher dan grades we did those 2 forms. After forms you are told to move to the other side of the room. The room is set up kind of like a tournament, but with only 2 rings. The first ring is for basics and poomsae, and the other side of the room is for sparring. For sparring they will have about 4 matches at once going on. Right away you put on sparring gear. You wear the full gear including a groin cup and mouth piece. But you do not have to wear the WTF tournament feet pads and gloves. You simply have to wear the basic arm guards, shin guards, hogu, head gear, groin cup, and mouth guard. They provided the hogu and head gear. You had to provide the rest of the gear. We then sparred. It’s supposed to be 1 minute of sparring and that is it, but my match went on for maybe 40 seconds. I think they count the 1 minute when the referee calls out the command before you even start fighting. I had to fight a tall guy who was bigger. It was kind of intimidating, but it was ok and I just fought like I was in a tournament. Master Jeong told me not to try and hurt people and not to go all out but in the heat of battle I felt like I had to actually fight. It was okay and no one got hurt. It just feels like a tournament and you have those nerves before you fight. After we sparred and did our thing the other guy was nice and very respectful to me and bowed to me and shook my hand. It was cool. Finally after sparring we had to break a brick. The brick was plastic. About 5 people in a line had to either break a plastic brick or plastic boards. The bricks and boards are supposed to be made to be as strong as the actual things. It is not easy to break the plastic bricks as they are very hard. But of course even a teenager can break them. I broke my brick the first try. I believe you get 2 or 3 times to try and break them. I am not sure, but I heard that breaking is not mandatory and you can still pass without it. So if you cannot break the brick you can still pass if you did well on other parts of the test. After the breaking technique there was  written portion of the test which was a multiple choice paper to fill out with 1 essay question at the end. All of the questions had things to do with Taekwondo history, philosophy, Olympic rules, theoretical knowledge of techniques and such. It was all in Korean and Master Jeong had to read it for me and explain it all in English. After I filled it out I handed it in and I was done. Boom! Test completed!

        Whew! After I did the brick breaking I was awarded a certificate of excellence and a gold medal for performing with top quality, especially for poomsae. They did not give these out to everyone. Only a couple of people got them in each division. I received the award for the adults testing for high dan rank.

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They printed out the certificate right there because they added my name on it, and spelled my name wrong but it is ok and I am so grateful to be acknowledged as a great Taekwondoin. To be acknowledged by the Koreans is so wonderful! I am so proud of myself and Master Jeong really taught me well!

        The Kukkiwon promotion test is not usually held at the actual Kukkiwon anymore. The only people who are allowed to test in Korea are residence. Either you are Korean and a citizen, or you have lived in Korea legally for 6 months. I have lived here for 6 months so I was eligible to test here. You cannot just travel to Korea and test at the Kukkiwon. They expect you to test in your home country and apply by mail. Also, in Korea you can actually fail the test. Unlike in America where virtually nobody fails ever because they paid money. But even so, some of the quality of students testing I saw was very poor and in my opinion not deserving of a black belt. So they still let things slide and allow low quality people to pass the test apparently. Hopefully, this changes. But if you do really, really bad or cannot remember the form or something, you can fail. That is what I have heard. The test is run in a strict way like the military. They yell commands and have you line up and bow. You are then told to move to other areas fast. It is very serious and strict. Testing is usually held in various regions of Korea. For whatever province you live in, that is where you will test. Our test is in Gyeong Gi-do and the city was Hanam. So it was held by the Gyeong Gi-do Taekwondo Association (GTA). Kind of like how in America each state has it’s own Taekwondo association under the USAT. In Korea it is all under the authority of the KTA. But yes, they do still hold promotion tests in the actual Kukkiwon, but not as much as they used to. It is mainly an office place and a place for special events such as demos they do every night for the general public.

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Receiving my new belt for 4th dan from Master Jeong

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        The purpose of the Kukkiwon promotion test is to check that you know the motions of Taekwondo, that you understand how to perform Taekwondo and how to actually use it. The sparring is held just to prove you can fight and know foot work and understand the sport rules as well. They also want to check your power with the breaking to show you are strong with technique. The Kukkiwon test is not to prove you are some gold medal world champion fighter or some deadly killer, but to show you have a mastery of the basics and are worthy of your dan grade. With all of the people testing, time is limited so the test is very short and straight to the point. I am sure the exam your local dojang holds for your test may or may not be much harder and more difficult. All that matters for testing is the Kukkiwon’s requirements of knowledge. Your instructor may have you do other things for him but the Kukkiwon requires just a small amount of things. That is how it is in Korea.

        I had a wonderful experience testing in Korea! I am not 4th dan and worthy of a Taekwondo master! YES!

Taekwondo Applications Fight Scene And Update On My Martial Arts Pursuits

        So I have been in Korea for 6 months. A lot of stuff has gone down, some negative stuff I can’t talk about that has to do with work, but other than that I have been training in Taekwondo and Jiu Jitsu frequently. I had stopped training in MMA classes because I have been to tired and did not have my head on straight because of stress so I do not want to spar and have something bad happen. I have stuck with BJJ diligently and even earned my 1st stripe on my white belt at Fight Gallery MMA. Unfortunately, my instructor forgot to put it on my belt, but he put it on my name plate on the door that I am 1st stripe. In my opinion you do not ask for a rank or care, you get it when you do. A physical stripe on my belt does not make me a better fighter. So I don’t care, but I am 1 stripe white belt rank now. I have a desire to try some more tournaments in the future. My teacher is really good and taught me some really cool stuff. But, for now I need to take a break because I ended up moving. Also, BJJ in the gi is murder on your fingers. It ruins them. It tears them up and breaks them up. It is bad for your hands in the long run. I feel that taking breaks will heal my fingers and keep their normal functioning lasting in the long run in my life. My goal is to stay healthy while learn a lot, and I sure have learned plenty in  ground fighting! I feel very competent for grappling in self defense situations with my Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Taekwondo skills, not to mention what I learned from Muay Thai and MMA classes.

        I have been trying my hardest to perfect my poomsae and have high quality Taekwondo skills. Master Jeong has helped me so much in Taekwondo to perfect my poomsae better. He is not only a great teacher, but also a great friend and someone who is there to help me in life when I need it most. He has gone out of his way to help me so much while I am in Korea that if it were not for him I would not have survived easily and been able to move and do things in Korea. In 1 week, this Saturday, I will test for 4th dan black belt. I know I will pass easily and cannot wait to finally have an official 4th degree black belt in Taekwondo by the Kukkiwon. It is so cool that I get to test in Korea as well! How many foreigners can claim they have tested in Korea with Koreans? I will definitely make a report on that after Saturday! I will tell you all how it works in Korea and what they require. It honestly is not very much!

        After I get my 4th dan I have to wait about 3 months in July to take the Foreign Instructor Certification Course in Muju at the Taekwondowon. That will make me a recognized Taekwondo master worldwide. This is the reason I wanted to live in Korea and work, to have these experiences. To get my martial arts credentials going strong. Then I can open my own dojang and teach Taekwondo for actual fighting and self defense.

        Meanwhile Master Jeong had me fight him for a short video to showcase some basic applications for Taekwondo poomsae in a mock fight. We filmed a fight scene and I play a bad Taekwondo gangster. Check out the fight scene and enjoy it! We had a lot of fun and it is supposed to be funny as well as show some maneuvers of poomsae applications. I hope you enjoy it! We will make many more episodes. I have only been 2 of the videos so far. Episode 1 I was not in, but I was in the last part of Episode 2 and then Episode 3. Check them all out! We will be making episode 4 soon!

 

*UPDATE* Episode 4 was made May 17th. 19 days after this article was originally published. Watch it below!!!!

I Am Now Training MMA And BJJ In Korea, Kyeoktuki

        Recently a new gym opened up in my neighborhood here in Bucheon, Korea. It is literally about 500 feet away from the outside of my building. There is no reason not to check it out, so I did. I ended up feeling the place out and I signed up. The instructor was cool and all the students were very nice. It is a place that lacks the big stink of ego that seemed to plague every American MMA gym. Koreans have a more respectful attitude in their culture when involved in activities or within an institution. Places such as jobs, schools, your church, your group of friends, or your martial arts gym are full of a lot of respect and calmness. This is not to say that every part of Korea is respectful, because any other international resident living here will tell you that Korea has some of the biggest aholes in the world and people who exude some of the most backward, irrational behavior in all of Asia. Nevertheless, this does not take away the fact that Korea generally has a more respectful and honorable attitude than other places. Especially within the martial arts. It feels as a little of the Taekwondo spirit is left inside MMA here. The Korean Mudo spirit. You can feel it even if there is no Taekwondo in these gyms, unless someone trained in it before; but it is not taught.

        So I felt safe here and had a positive experience. I have trained for a week. I go 2 nights a week for about 5 hour worth of training. It is very good training and even includes 5 rounds of circuit training for body conditioning. I tell you, I am so sore.

        Studying Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is my main goal. To learn fundamentals, obtain a strong ground fighting structure for self defense, and hopefully earn my blue belt at least. The other things I learn at this gym is Muay Thai and MMA, which combined it all together. I am learning some wrestling stuff with the Muay Thai that is going to help me be a better fighter. It has been some very fun training.

        The training is safe so far, no one is hitting full contact and our classes are working strictly for the purpose of getting techniques down. The Korean students, even the big boys, those few giants of Korea you see, are some of the nicest guys and fun to spar with. I even noticed that there is 1 girl training to who is a white belt beginner. It is a safe place.

Here is the link to the gym. It is called Fight Gallery.

What is interesting is that this gym is called “Kyuktooki Garrarri,” if you sound out the Hangul when reading it. So it says, “Fight Gallery.” MMA and Kickboxing here is often referred to either as K1 (As in K-1, the Japanese Kickboxing promotion) by the average Korean, or Kyeoktuki. There was a DVD released a decade ago by Turtle Press called Kyuktooki: Korean Kickboxing and I bought it a few years ago. Many westerners wanted to understand what it meant and if Kyuktooki is a real Korean style of martial arts. Finally, I know the real answer. Kyuktooki, or Kyeoktuki, is not actually a martial arts style, but more of a kind of martial art, or type of martial arts. It basically speaks of free fighting. What Kyeoktuki actually means when literally translated into English is “hit fighting.” Or “striking fighting.” It basically is the term for real Kickboxing as well as used to describe MMA (even though MMA has grappling too). Kyeoktuki is a style of martial arts much the same as MMA is a style of martial arts. However, there are organizations in Korea that claim they teach Kyeoktuki and they have made it their ow style with their own black belt ranks. So there are certain organizational styles of Kyeoktuki, but overally it is not actually a special ancient Korean kicboxing style. Much like the Turtle Press DVD actually says, Kyeoktuki is a mixed style of free fighting that can include anything from Taekwondo, Karate, Muay Thai, Judo, Wrestling etc. All of the rage from Thailand about how Korea is “stealing” their martial art or lying about something are nonsense. Korea is not stealing or claiming to have created anyting. Many Kyeoktuki fighters are Muay Thai stylists. Most are actually. There are also a ton of Taekwondo Kyeoktuki fighters. Kyeoktuki is a general term for a more serious fighting sport, that does not include Olympic Taekwondo since it has such limiting rules and tons of padding.

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Starting over as a white belt is good for any martial artist to learn humility. This is me in my new gi (dobok) and with my new instructor.

        So now I can actually say, “Hey I am training Kyeoktuki in Korea” which is kind of cool, even if it is just MMA. Now when I describe my Taekwondo training and studies in Korea to people here I can just say, “I train in Taekwondo for Kyeoktuki and want to teach Taekwondo for Kyeoktuki and not the Olympics. The average Korean instantly understands what I mean. They are also fascinated to know their native martial art is actually a self defense system when I explain to them that my “boxing” is actually just Taekwondo. They are confused when I throw straight jabs and rights from up above and not from the hip. The average Korean has seriously lost all sense of what Taekwondo started out as because of the Olympics and stupid cornball, Taekwondo dancers everywhere. Also, they see poomsae a lot, but really do not understand the point. Along with the term Kyeoktuki, I mentioned Mudo which is the Korean transliteration of the Japanese term of Budo which is the way of the warrior. Taekwondo is Mudo, and it is Kyeoktuki when taken out of the Olympics context.

        Now about my training in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, it is humbling to start over at a new gym as a white belt. Oh, yes I have done this before in Judo, Boxing, and MMA in America, but yes I am doing it again and it is only going to benefit my martial arts spirit. My goal right now is to gain competent ground skills for real self defense and be able to hold my own if I get taken down in a fight. The other goal I have is to earn my blue belt. After that I will see if I will one day earn a purple belt. Who knows. My instructor is a professional MMA fighter and he is a cool guy. He is a 4 stripe purple belt and he is very calm and kind. He also has a decade of Wrestling/Judo/Muay Thai/Boxing training. He speaks English (Thank God) and he has a warm heart for foreigners. Fight Gallery is a great place for non-Koreans who speak English and it is a welcoming environment. I will give more details of my training in future posts. Stick around and check back from time to time.

        So now I am doing Taekwondo and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu with Muay Thai and MMA on the side. I hope this helps me be a true martial arts master. When I earn my Taekwondo 4th dan this year at the Kukkiwon I want to know that I deserve to be a teacher of the fighting arts.

Taebaek Poomsae Application (Bunhae) (Part 1)

        Just for fun I am going to make a few simple, short, not in depth at all but just showing the techniques, videos on TaeBaek and how you could use the movements in a real fight, or self defense encounter. TaeBaek is the second black belt form and it has a few interesting movements. To the untrained eye, the overly imaginative, the martial ballet dancer, mcdojanger, and the combat ignorant these moves look like performance. They sure are, but they are a performance of martial arts techniques that can actually work in a very simplistic way. Forms are a training tool to develop the basic way a fighter moves, his balance, motor skills, and various techniques. You would not fight in a poomsae fashion, but would modify them to a quicker more accurate defense and attack.

        One day I hope to make more serious and in depth videos on such topics, but the lack of people willing to do things with me, lack of skilled people to be in such a video, and and time limit me. But nonetheless here is one short video showing a portion of Taebaek. This shows how to defense against a grab and haymaker that is often used in street attacks. It shows how to block, punch them hard, crack their knee and smash their face with your elbow. It is really strong. I came up with this idea on my own just using logical reasoning on how to actually use techniques in a realistic and simple way. All actual uses of poomsae applications will be done in a very basic and simple way. Not dramatic movements as when performing the poomsae exercise.

Diamond block to punch counter, side kick and elbow strike on the second half of Taebaek:

 

        I hope you got something out of that video. It is my interpretation of the movements on the second half of the form.

        It is a shame that sport poomsae competition does not include actual combat application training. It instead simple focuses on aesthetically pleasing movements which I believe has weakened Taekwondo and made it too soft. The WTF really should emphasize fighting applications for forms training. Also, I do not limit myself to the standard self defense ideas the Kukkiwon says, but include them as well as create my own or find my own that already existed. A lot of ideas can be found in Karate as well because they have most of the same moves.

        Poomsae is also not the full extend of moves in Taekwondo, but a small portion. The forms are just a collection of important basic movements, but there are many other moves and technique soutside of poomsae that Taekwondo has in its arsenal. Many more.

        I will try and make a few more videos on this form and show more self defense concepts from it. Just keep checking over time.

        I must say, Happy New Year people!! May 2016 give you many blessings and good Taekwondo training! May you reach your goals! Thank you for reading my small blog!

My Experience At The KTA 2015 Education Fair At The Taekwondowon

As a foreigner, being allowed to attend the official KTA 2015 Education Fair was a serious privilege. I was the only non-Korean there. It was a weekend of seminars on various topics of Taekwondo. It had the standard lectures of how to run a school, teach better, and some other less exciting topics, but the reason I went was to attend the technique classes and learn new combat concepts. I am extremely refreshed and encouraged to have seen high level Kukkiwon masters teach classes I was in about how to actually fight with Taekwondo. That is right, the Korean masters are teaching younger instructors about actually fighting and not doing performance and not only doing Olympic sparring. This was basically Korean street fighting.

My instructor, Master Jeong, from Bucheon who is a 6th dan, Kukkiwon Education Committee member, and official KTA instructor had connections to get me into the fair and take some seminars. I paid 30,000 won to attend the weekend events. That is about $30 US. AMAZING! It included food and a room with a shower and nice floor heater. It was top notch like a luxury hotel. I am so thankful to my instructor for getting me in to this. The Taekwondowon is a center for Taekwondo culture with many acres of land and several large buildings. There is the famous “Taekwondo Park” as well, but this event was in the winter so the park was not open. They were busy renovating it and repairing things. A lot of landscapers were doing work all over. The museum was not open either. I will have to go back and check all of this out. The Taekwondowon is very popular and has commercial aspects to it that may be annoying to me, but there is still enough traditional martial arts and serious things about it. It will be full of tourists when it is open. But the event I went to sponsored by the KTA was so great!

During this entire weekend event I did not understand a lot of what was spoken or written. I do not speak Korean yet and I cannot read it yet. So all of the seminars I just copied the way the master moved and positioned himself and a couple of nice Koreans helped me understand what was going on.

The first seminar I took was Sparring Coaching topics. It was taught by a Master Lee who is known for sparring and self defense. He taught various conditioning drills and footwork with kicking techniques that coaches can use for their students. It was pretty good stuff. I remember these kinds of drills back in my Olympic sparring days as a teenager.

The next seminar afterward was on the subject of Poomsae Applications. This was poomsae fighting technique. To use the techniques in poomsae for actual fighting. This class was taught by a Master Um who also wrote a book on the topic. He had us do blocking drills and using concepts from poomsae with partners. He emphasized modifying techniques to make them tighter and faster instead of doing them only the “poomsae way and speed.” I could tell he had some boxing or Muay Thai skills as well in how he would throw punches and kicks. But all of the techniques were official from WTF poomsae. He talked about targeting and adapting the strikes to whatever position the enemy is in and he was super fast! His class was a breath of fresh air to finally get poomsae techniques confirmed as for so many decades foreigners did not learn and were unable to teach applications to forms in Taekwondo. It has been lost. But like Karate teaching Bunkai it is great to know the Kukkiwon and KTA are teaching such things for Taekwondo. There were even boxing style slips and perries. This seminar was awesome and on par with the seminar I took the next day.

The next day I attended 2 more seminars. The first seminar was on Hoshinsool, straight up self defense. This session was taught by a Master Kim. Master Kang  was basically teaching us Korean street fighting and kixckboxing with Taekwondo for actual fighting. He had perries mixed with the traditional blocks and boxing style punches, bops, ducks and some kicks. He taught us various striking and blocking drills, and kikboxing types of arranged sparring drills for developing hand eye coordination. I thought this seminar was amazing. It was very action packed and he was emphasizing fighting and not sport sparring. He also wrote a book on self defense with Taekwondo that will be out in English next year.

The last seminar was right after the previous. It was a Poomsae seminar on white belt basics teaching taught by the #1 poomsae champion of Yongin University (a Taekwondo university). I never learned his name because I could not understand Korea. But he is quite famous like the others. The seminar teacing was about where feet should be held correctly, fist distance from body and other arm, and how to drills white belts to learn them. It was interesting enough, but of course I did not speak Korean and the entire seminar was basically a lecture and not an exercise class. I basically sat there clueless until he showed a couple of hand positions and stances. He even surprised I was there and said that he does not speak English, only Korean. Then he wanted to know my name. It was kind of funny.

I had a great time and it was very wonderful to learn that Taekwondo is a fighting art, not a sport and not a dance. There is a sport using Taekwondo called Olympic Sparring, but Taekwondo itself is a fighting art. That is why I train and that is what the KTA was teaching during the KTA seminar at the Taekwondowon in Muju, Korea.

General Choi’s Communist Sympathy Seen Through ITF 

        If there are reasons not to train in the International Taekwon-Do Federation style of martial arts or join the organization, one is that General Choi Hong Hi (1918-2002), the so called “Father of Taekwondo” by ITF enthusiasts, was obviously a Communist sympathizer. Worse, he was a North Korean “Juche” style Communist sympathizer. This is apparent in his flight to North Korea to bring his martial art there to teach soldiers and others the ITF Taekwon-Do style. He was such a sympathizer that he thought it was absolutely necessary to create a mid rank black belt form called “Juche.” Wikipedia states:

“Juche (or chuch’e) is a Sino-Korean word which is hard to translate. Literally, it means ‘subjectivity’ or ‘agency’, and in political discourse has a connotation of ‘self-reliance’ and of ‘independence’.

The official line of the North Korean regime attributes the origin of Juche to Kim Il-Sung’s experiences in the ‘Anti-Imperialist Youth League’ in 1930 in his “Liberation struggle” against Japan. However, the first documented reference to Juche as an ideology did not appear until 1955, in a speech given by Kim Il Sung entitled On Eliminating Dogmatism and Formalism and Establishing Juche in Ideological Work. The speech had been delivered to promote a political purge similar to the earlier Yan’an Rectification Movement in China.

Hwang Jang-yeop, Kim’s top adviser on ideology, ‘discovered’ Kim’s 1955 speech in the late 1950s when Kim, having established a cult of personality, sought to develop his own version of Marxism–Leninism into a North Korean creed.”

It is interesting that Juche was first publicly promoted in 1955, the same year Taekwondo’s formal name was established. Maybe Choi saw a revolutionary link between Taekwondo and Juche. The official website of North Korea, The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, explains Juche:

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is guided in its activities by the Juche idea authored by President Kim Il Sung. The Juche idea means, in a nutshell, that the masters of the revolution and construction are the masses of the people and that they are also the motive force of the revolution and construction.

The Juche idea is based on the philosophical principle that man is the master of everything and decides everything. It is the man-centred world outlook and also a political philosophy to materialize the independence of the popular masses, namely, a philosophy which elucidates the theoretical basis of politics that leads the development of society along the right path.

The Government of the DPRK steadfastly maintains Juche in all realms of the revolution and construction.

Establishing Juche means adopting the attitude of a master towards the revolution and construction of one’s country. It means maintaining an independent and creative standpoint in finding solutions to the problems which arise in the revolution and construction. It implies solving those problems mainly by one’s own efforts and in conformity with the actual conditions of one’s own POLITICS country. The realization of independence in politics, selfsufficiency in the economy and self-reliance in national defence is a principle the Government maintains consistently.

The Korean people value the independence of the country and nation and, under the pressure of imperialists and dominationsts, have thoroughly implemented the principle of independence, self-reliance and self-defence, defending the country’s sovereignty and dignity firmly.

It is an invariable policy of the Government of the Republic, guided by the Juche idea, to treasure the Juche character and national character and maintain and realize them. The Government of the Republic always adheres to the principle of Juche, the principle of national independence, and thus is carrying out the socialist cause of Juche.” (http://www.korea-dpr.com/juche_ideology.html)

All of that really says nothing. It is written in a confusing way and seems to be a lot of fluff. The deeper policies and beliefs of North Korea are not expressed well. There is not enough in those paragraphs to really differentiate Juche from what other nations do. It is obvious it has communist implications though. Even so, the above statements make Juche seem like such a nice, warm, and fuzzy belief system all Taekwondo people worldwide should embrace. Like it is just a great way to get everyone together in a country to solve problems and be creative and happy. Wrong.

The website “North Korean Christians” gives a truthful profile of Juche:

The idea of Juche, also known “Kimilsungism” after Kim Ilsung, is the religious, political, social and economic ideology of North Korea (“The Juche Idea”).

The Juche Idea was first introduce by Kim Ilsung in 1955 to distance North Korea from the Soviet Union, which at the time was undoing many of the Stalinist policies that Kim Ilsung liked.

Over time, Juche evolved, borrowing from Marxism, Leninism, Stalinism, Maoism and Confucianism whatever Kim Ilsung and Kim Jongil wanted, as well as their own ideas, and in 1972 replaced Marxism-Leninism in the North Korean constitution as the country’s official ideology.

According to Juche, there is no god but Kim Ilsung, the country’s “Eternal President”, which makes North Korea the world’s only country governed by an embalmed dead body. Juche attributed divine powers also to Kim Jongil, the sole author, editor and interpreter of Juche. Whether his divine powers trickle down to Kim Jongun remains to be seen.

Juche espouses political independence and uses as justification the Korean peninsula’s long history of suffering as a vassal state or the battlefield for the region’s stronger countries. In reality, Juche produced an isolated state immune to international norms and laws, where the only rule of law is Kim Ilsung and his family.

Juche also espouses economic independence, but the reality couldn’t be farther from it. The Korean peninsula’s northern half, only 18% of whose mountainous terrain is arable, historically depended on the agriculture of the relatively less mountainous southern half of the peninsula for its food. When the peninsula was split north-south in 1953, North Korea lost access to its bread basket, and Juche’s disdain for international trade destined its people to hunger and starvation.

The North Korean economy has been kept afloat not by Juche but by massive food and fuel aid from the Soviet Union, China, South Korea, Japan, United States and the United Nations, as well as Juche’s sole export crop, opium, which annually earns an estimated $500 million to $1 billion.” (http://northkoreanchristians.com/juche-idea.html)

Juche is an excuse for the iron fisted rule of the Kim dynasty, which has left millions upon millions of North Koreans dying of starvation. The Kim’s live in luxury while their people die. Any defectors are thrown in prison camps and executed. Kim Jung Un has recently executed a lot of people with anti-aircraft guns, including his uncle. North Korea is basically a hellhole of horror and death. If a person dissents or says something negative about the leader of North Korea they and their entire family are thrown into prison labor camps to die of starvation. Many torture methods are used, and often times prison guards and police use ITF Taekwondo to beat up, and even beat to death, political prisoners. This should give one a better understanding of the reality of what Juche means, and what it meant for Choi Hong Hi to give honor to Kim Il Sung and his Juche philosophy.

General Choi’s imagination of Karate moves was out of control…

General Choi’s martial arts experience and training history was said to be in Japanese Karate where he earned the rank of 2nd dan black belt in Shotokan Karate under Master Gichin Funikoshi. This is debatable though as there are claims there is no documented evidence of him actually testing or being certified. Choi often trained alone. The official Kukkiwon stance is that Choi never actually earned a black belt when he tried to take over the KTA and run Taekwondo for himself. That was another issue that angered kwan leaders. Before the KTA he never earned any serious black belt rank which would give him credence as a master of martial arts. This is why I believe that much of the ITF forms are ridiculous and not based on logic. Oh, there are a few which are good and I can honestly admit I once in awhile practice some, but these forms are ones probably developed mostly by Nam Tae Hi, his #1 physical performer who was actually a skilled martial artist. Choi developed the Juche tul in the 1980s which is a very showy form made to impress with flying kicks and other stylish movements. If there is any actual combat application I would like to know it, but it seems it was created just to show off and look flashy. It seems Choi’s imagination was out of control. This is displayed in his imaginative moves for his tul (forms in ITF are called tul, they do not use the term poomsae). For example, this is a serious application for a double block standing on one leg:

Now what are the actual chances of such a block being utilized in a real combat situation? I say slim to none. And more so, what are the chances of 2 guys doing high flying jump kicks at you at the exact same time in a real combat situation? Of course it could happen, but even if it did, wouldn’t it be smart just to duck or move out of the way? I doubt two forearm blocks like that would be strong enough to keep the flying kicks of two attacker’s full body weight coming at you full force while you are standing on one leg. It is not a logical move for defense. It is not plausible to explain the above photo by saying it was just to be fun, or cute, or even a joke. It is an absolutely serious photograph. A grandmaster of a martial art would not take a photo to show off like that unless he thought the moves he was posing in were actually profound. It is absolutely a silly photo.

The greatest thing about Korean Taekwondo, the Kukkiwon style, is that applications to movements are some of the most simple, common sense,  and easy to perform and pull off techniques, that can be realistically applied in a self defense situation. Of course the average student who is not advanced enough cannot see the multiple applications for moves, but when one finds out the applications from his instructor the student will see the movements are not ridiculous as in the photo above. At least they shouldn’t be.

Now back to Choi’s communist sympathies….

Choi was the first president of the KTA, then he briefly stepped down to do government duties in Malaysia. Later, in 1965 Choi acted as the 3rd president of the Korean Taekwondo Association after he was elected again. Even so, Choi caused a lot of strife within the Korean martial arts community and annoyed most of the early Korean martial arts leaders with his despotic attitude. He used his status and position as a general in the military to influence and intimidate people and get what he wanted done. Since he was in a position of power he could easily control people. The KTA members did not approve of General Choi’s behavior and did not agree with his desire to control Taekwondo. He was told to step down as KTA president in 1966. He was given the blessing by Lee Chong Woo to start his own ITF organization. This was simply a compromise to hurry the stepping down of Choi to get him the heck out of the KTA so they could progress. It is stated in A Modern History of Taekwondo:

LEE Chong Woo comments on the issue: ‘CHOI Hong Hi was like an authoritarian dictator so UHM Woon Kyu and I had to kick him out. One morning we went to visit him at his house in Hannamdong (near Yong San) to ask him to resign, but CHOI Hong Hi begged us to allow him to remain as KTA President for six more months. We told him he would have to choose between three things: ‘Money’, ‘Position’ or ‘Honor’. We told him that if he chose Honor and resigned, we would help him make his own International Taekwon-Do Federation, but we wanted him to resign immediately and get out of the Korea Taekwondo Association‘” (p. 25) emphasis mine

Since Choi Hong Hi was literally kicked out of the KTA and lost his control, and most importantly, his respect in the Korean Taekwondo community his ego was bruised and his pride was damaged. Being the egomaniac he was, he wanted to get revenge or snub the Korean Taekwondo Association members by claiming his International Taekwon-Do Federation martial art was the only true Taekwondo in the world. He quickly made huge efforts to spread the ITF worldwide ahead of the KTA. The KTA which later built the Kukkiwon facility, and developed the organizational structure of national Taekwondo, and the World Taekwondo Federation sport organization was slower at spreading Taekwondo to other nations. This made the world see Choi’s ITF first and gave it popularity. It was a power play and a smart move. A little later the KTA sent out many instructors worldwide to promote the Kukkiwon and WTF sport. There were disputes and conflicts here and there all over the world between the ITF and Kukkiwon instructors. It seems that since the Kukkiwon and KTA were linked with the nation of Korea and its government it gave them credibility and strong support. Foreigners training in the KTA/Kukki-style of Taekwondo could feel secure in the fact their Taekwondo was the Korean cultural martial art. Taekwondo was a Korean martial art much like Karate is a Japanese style that has its roots in Japan. Choi had established his ITF headquarters in Toronto, Canada and registered it with Canada shortly after resigning from his presidency in the KTA. The truth is that ITF members can trace their linage to a man, and not a national or cultural martial art (unless they wanted to say they trained in Canadian Taekwondo, but obviously they didn’t want to say that). With the government of Korea accepting the KTA and the development of Kukki-Taekwondo (National Taekwondo) Choi wanted to have it be known that his ITF was the real Korean version and he was left wanting more to be desired to propagate his ITF. He had to figure out a way to give more weight to his Taekwondo style being linked to Korea, besides the fact he was a Korean who created it. Choi for years always wrote Taekwondo in a normal way, but later he changed the spelling of “Taekwondo” to “Taekwon-Do” to differentiate his style from the KTA. He then began to claim this is the only true way to spell Taekwondo that it had to have a hyphen separating “Taekwon” from “Do.” This is why you always see ITF people spelling Taekwondo like “Taekwon-Do.” Many ITF members get upset if you spell it the normal way. The truth is Taekwondo is a Korean word and Koreans use Hangul to write words. In Hangul there is no hyphen or necessary separation of words. Literally translating the actual hangul with a hyphen is grammatically incorrect and makes no sense. So the original spelling of Taekwondo of the KTA is the true way to spell it in English.  Unless Choi wanted to claim that Taekwondo was an English word and not a Korean word. How would you translate the hyphen in other languages such as Arabic or Chinese that does not use hyphens either? So the whole hyphen emphasis is illogical. Choi not only wanted to be known as the sole creator of Taekwondo in it’s current ITF form at the time, but also claim that his “Taekwon-Do” of his ITF, was a true, historic, Korean martial art accepted by Korea. It can be said that Choi wanted to take Taekwondo to North Korea so he could claim a “Korean national” connection. To claim his ITF style is from Korean soil. He basically defected to the North.

In 1972 he betrayed Korea by having a soft view of the North Korean regime led by the despot Kim Il Sung (the “living god and father of all Koreans,” and “The Eternal President” according to North Korean mythology) by bringing his ITF Taekwon-Do to North Korea.

*an interesting side note is that the ATA mcdojang organization, which actually was an offshoot of the ITF, was founded by H.U. Lee who claimed he was the Eternal Grandmaster of ATA Taekwondo. It is obvious he got that idea from the Kims. The only difference is he did not have his body embalmed to be viewed in glass at the ATA headquarters for “eternity” after his death like communist dictators did*. 

Choi and his remaining loyal students performed demonstrations for Kim Il Sung, and his top instructors taught North Korean soldiers the ITF style. He became friends with Kim Il Sung and his son Kim Jung Il and found nothing wrong with what they were doing to North Koreans by their iron fisted rule. If he actually did find something wrong with what they are doing he probably wouldn’t have went there or became friends with such people. Unless, he kept his mouth shut and ignored the atrocities because he realized he benefited a lot out of the relationships for his own agenda. That would tell you a lot about his person, but it is more plausible to assume he did not find anything wrong with the Kims.

Linking up with North Korea and taking them martial arts, his Taekwon-Do style, was the ultimate insult to those in South Korea who he feels slighted them. He not only slighted the Korean Taekwondo Association, Kukkiwon, and the World Taekwondo Federation, he insulted his former nation and government by betraying them. After he made the trip to Korea, and after developing his ITF organization in Canada for several years he decided to tour North Korea and do demos and create relations with North Korea in 1979. Later in 1982 Choi left Canada with his family in early 1982 to live in Pyongyang. North Korea than headed he ITF. Therefore during the 80’s the idea that ITF is North Korean Taekwondo was spread by martial arts students worldwide who wanted to understand the difference between the ITF and what was then known as the “WTF style,” which people called South Korean Taekwondo.

Choi’s son states:

“the relationship became unnecessarily deep. In 1979, Choi Seung-chol of the United Front Department visited us in Canada and promised support for our family and the ITF. He proposed that my father visit the North. Soon after, the Choi Hong-hi Taekwondo Demo Team gave its first performance at Pyongyang Stadium in September 1980.” (http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/article.aspx?aid=2894692&ref=mobile)

Ahn (2008) explains, “According to Choi, North Korea established pro-North, anti-South organizations around the world with the taekwondo masters that it has dispatched through the ITF. Such organizations were launched in Germany, Canada, the United States and other countries, he said.”

Choi’s son, Choi Jung Hwa, also claims his father had pro-North Korea policies which he did not agree with. He claims ITF used Taekwondo to send masters around the world who were actually North Korean agents who would be used for assassination attempts on South Korean officials and the president. He even admits that he was also trained to assassinate then South Korean president Chun Doo Hwan

Choi did not really flee South Korea because of a dictator…

Keep in mind that South Korea had a history of dictator rule as well. Syngman Rhee was the first elected president of South Korea and a staunch anti-communist. He was largely responsible for Korean independence against the Japanese and the promotion of Korean nationalism. But he eventually became an authoritarian regime leader and had people executed who were against him and kept power outside the rules of the Korean constitution. He also suppressed many communist activists. General Choi was in the military under this president and seemed to like him. He not only fought in the Korean War under this president against the communist North, but he introduced the first Taekwondo demonstration in Korea for him in 1954. It was during this demonstration that President Rhee was impressed with the idea of Taekwondo and decided that Taekwondo would be a good name for a unified Korean, national martial art. It was during this demo that Nam Tae Hi (Choi’s #1 man) famously broke a large amount of bricks with his bare hands causing President Rhee to express his desire for all of the military in Korea to learn Taekwondo. Of course the martial arts they were performing were basically Karate as Taekwondo was not officially named until the next year, and no special forms were created yet, as they still practiced Japanese Kata. In 1960 Rhee was ousted by a student led protest. Eventually this led to military coup d’états  that were very short lived and led to Park Chung Hee being elected president. General Choi actually supported the coup d’état, but was upset Park was then elected president. This is because Choi along with others in a military court voted to sentence Park to death for being a communist leader of a cell in the Korean constabulary in the late 1940’s prior. This is ironic since Choi defected to North Korea later in his life and shows his hypocrisy. The accusations were unfounded and Syngman Rhee commuted his sentence. When Park became president it caused problems for Choi because Park extremely disliked him. I would say it is rightly so after being voted to die by him. Anyone would resent someone for that. Choi was asked to resign from the South Korean military in 1962 and given the assignment of ambassador to Malaysia. This would no doubt have made Choi hate Park even more. This is where Choi developed most of his tul, on Malaysian soil. In 1964 he flew to Vietnam to introduce his tul to the Korean soldiers who were already training in Taekwondo. He wanted to make sure his forms would be spread and accepted by the military. He had help with his #1 man, Nam Tae Hi of course. It is very interesting Choi would be supporting the effort against communism in this way, serving South Korea, but later defecting and becoming a communist sympathizer.

After his first term, Park Chung Hee was reelected again and later became a dictatorship through various means. He angered North Korea a lot and was vehemently against communism. North Korea tried to assassinate him a few times but failed. Interestingly enough he was assassinated in 1979 by a Korean CIA director who wanted power, you know typical stuff that happens with men who desire power and control. The point of mentioning this is that many ITF proponents will express that Choi was exiled out of South Korea by an evil South Korean government run by a dictator. If Choi was such a great guy who wanted freedom from dictators why was he cool with Syngman Rhee? Choi stuck around with South Korea for long enough before leaving in 1972. He tolerated Park’s disdain for him and served as ambassador to Malaysia. He even had Taekwondo taught to Korean troops and the South Vietnamese Army in the Vietnam War, along with U.S. special forces. During this time both KTA and Choi’s ITF were being mixed and taught in Vietnam, there was much crossover. This is the era of Taekwondo in Korea that had much overlap from KTA and ITF since Choi at this time had already stepped down from the KTA. So Choi fully supported the fight against communism, against the North Vietnamese Army and Viet Cong rebels. What a contrast from fighting in 1 war against North Korea, to support anti-communist struggles in Vietnam, to then turn around and support North Korea and the Juche ideology.

I don’t think the real reason Choi left Korea was because he somehow was forced. He did it on his own free will. ITF proponents will claim he spoke with dissent towards President Park and was forced to leave, but this is not true since Park tolerated him and gave him a position as ambassador to Malaysia. I would like to know exactly what public statements he made in history that would get him kicked out of Korea or executed. Also they will say that South Korea was run by a “brutal dictatorship.” President Park may have done some mean and nasty things that cannot be justified, but they are nowhere as evil or brutal as what was going on in North Korea with Kim Il Sung. Also Park did a lot of great things like boosting the Korean economy and making it progress and become a strong player in Asia (a tiger economy). Believe it or not sometimes dictators do good things and not only bad. And sometimes these dictators are worth supporting over another evil such as what North Korea and China would have done to South Korea if it won the war. If Park’s regime was so brutal you would think General Choi would have been tortured and executed, but he wasn’t. It seems evil dictators were not the real reason Choi left Korea. It seems he left simply because he was mad at the KTA an wanted to start an international movement of Taekwondo led by himself, to be the boss he wanted to be, to be seen as an important Korean figure, and control Taekwondo in the world. His attitude is very much like the dictators ITF proponents say threatened him. It also gives understanding possibly as to why Choi admired evil communist dictators in North Korea. He would probably be just like them if given such power.

Choi willingly promoted his Taekwon-Do to a truly brutal dictatorship in North Korea under Kim Il Sung. So historically ITF positively embraced evil. This is unlike the KTA and Kukkiwon which simply existed in Korea and did not willfully choose to be under dictatorships, it simply just survived and was allowed and promoted. It was after all Korea’s national martial art and sport, so why would a South Korean, nationalist president want to get rid of it? There is no dictator philosophy in Kukki-Taekwondo, but there are traditional Korean philosophical and cultural ideas promoted in it and martial arts philosophy of fighting. This cannot be said for ITF which literally has a communist dictator philosophy promoted in it of Juche. Also, much of the names for ITF forms are silly and named after historic Korean figures and things. It is kind of like if the United States made a martial art and named forms after George Washington or Paul Revere. Could you imagine that? “I will now perform The Midnight Ride Poomsae of Paul Revere! Seejak!! Most martial arts name their patterns after combat concepts, and philosophical ideas that apply to martial arts. ITF seems to have just been a way to be ultra nationalistic. At least in the Kukkiwon Taekwondo poomsae are full of philosophy and still distinctly Korean and display Korean,  national pride while still being relatable to foreigners. What foreigner literally cares about a guy named Dan Gun, or Toi Gye? Yes Dan Gun founded Korea in 2333 BC, and Toi Gye was the pen name of the scholar Yi Hwang who was a Neo-Confucianist scholar in the 16th century, but what the hell does that have to do with me learning to fight? I prefer the philosophy of Taegeuk, something that could be applied to anyone in any country and still is distinctly Korean. I do not prefer to embrace Juche and Kim Il Sungism in my Taekwondo.

2 kinds of Taekwondo existed but people did not understand that yet…

Before people understood the various separate styles and political organizational differences of martial arts the ignorant masses assumed Taekwondo was simply Karate. Karate was the buzzword for all martial arts in the West. In the early days of Taekwondo the term Karate was used all over the place to advertise Taekwondo gyms and much of that improper identification is still used today in various martial arts advertisements and signage. Lots of people all over the world trained in Karate in 50’s-80’s. During this era popular culture did not take into account the various styles of Karate, or that some martial art styles were in fact not even Karate, but were Aikido, Jiu Jitsu, or Kempo etc. Karate was also used interchangeably with Kung Fu when the popularity of Hong Kong Kung Fu fighting movies reached its height. Later, when people found out that there was a kind of “Karate” from Korea called Taekwondo, people assumed there was only one kind of Taekwondo in much the same way as people made no difference in their minds about different Karate styles and organizations. People assumed Taekwondo was just Taekwondo and did not understand there was an ITF and WTF which were not affiliated together or even the same styles. This was because both WTF/Kukkiwon and ITF would count all the people who claimed to do Taekwondo around the world regardless of organizational affiliation so that they could claim extremely large numbers of people training in Korea’s national martial art. They would add up both the ITF practitioners and WTF/Kukkiwon practitioners all over the world to claim that all of these people were training in the one style of Taekwondo with no differentiation of organizations. It benefited both sides and gave glory to Korea which was a common goal. For example if 2 million people in one country were training in ITF Taekwon-Do, and only 1 million people in the same country were training in WTF Taekwondo the WTF would state, “Over 3 million people train in the art of Taekwondo” in said country. Likewise, the ITF would claim that “3 million people trained in Taekwon-Do” as well and vice versa. Both ITF and Kukkiwon groups included memberships from both groups together to claim they are all doing the same martial art, or more accurately all of the numbers of people counted were training in Choi’s martial art if it was ITF propaganda, and if it was KTA/WTF/Kukkiwon propaganda they would simply say it was their style that had the numbers. Sometimes ITF may be in one country and WTF not in that country yet, but the WTF would act as if their Taekwondo is in that country by including ITF people in their worldwide numbers.

Even the lesser known groups at the time who branched off from the ITF and WTF to form their own organizations and the various large mcdojang groups advertise and claim numbers of practitioners the same way today. It is not uncommon for groups like the ITF, ATA and other mcdojang chains to claim that during the summer Olympics the Taekwondo event represents their martial art. An example is in Choi’s obituary in The Guardian which states: “…he and his students spread taekwondo across the globe, and saw it become a medal sport in Sydney at the 2000 Olympics” (http://www.theguardian.com/news/2002/aug/09/guardianobituaries.northkorea). Choi had nothing to do with the Olympics and his Taekwon-Do is a completely different style than WTF. They do not even use the same rules in their sport sparring. ITF sport is not in the Olympics. Only WTF sport is. Yet that is an example of propaganda making no differentiation of styles or organizations.

The reality of the population of the world training in Taekwondo was that some were training in ITF style and others in WTF style (just as it is today which now includes various smaller organizations and commercial chain schools). It benefited both sides to make the single martial art of Taekwondo seem like it was trained by billions of people. It was actually split up, but possibly the ITF in the early stages had more members and countries, but with the excitement and possibility of Taekwondo being an official Olympic sport in the 1980’s the majority then became Kukkiwon practitioners. Before the Olympic dreams, in the 1970’s, the ITF and Kukkiwon/WTF tried to unify and accept each other by giving opposite organization leaders honorary positions in each organization to create peace, but of course it did not work. It was very short lived. Even so, this also had an influence on the census of Taekwondo practitioners worldwide to keep being counting as one Taekwondo population instead of separate ITF and Kukkiwon populations. Koreans really wanted to take pride in that Taekwondo was “the worlds most popular martial art.”

There was also overlapping of instructors who liked both groups at the same time, or had training history in each group. I personally had a 9th dan black belt instructor who had training history in both ITF and Kukkiwon and was ranked in both. He was officially ranked as 9th dan in the Kukkiwon and ended up supporting the WTF. Over time such instructors either took full sides to either ITF or Kukkiwon. This especially became true when people heard about Choi’s trip to North Korea, and even more when he moved there. Many Koreans chose to distance themselves from him because of his support for North Korea. The majority of Korean master instructors began to support the Kukkiwon and join in the Olympic pursuit.

It was not long that pretty much everyone understood there were 2 kinds of Taekwondo, one was Choi’s ITF, and the other was Korea’s Kukkiwon. People were led to believe that ITF was from North Korea even though it came from Canada. Since Choi made claims that his ITF was the true Korean Taekwondo and he claimed “corrupt politicians” and “dictators” in South Korea cheated him, the North Korean connection of ITF, according to Choi, would then establish North Korea as the true nation of Taekwondo, not the South. This only promoted North Korean propaganda.

North Korean propaganda poster of ITF Taekwon-Do.  It says, “Let’s show the world our bravery and power!”

The funny thing is, not one ITF dojang that I know of has the guts to fly a North Korean flag inside, and always flies a South Korean flag at the head of the gym. This is ironic since South Korea does not acknowledge ITF as an official Korean martial art and ITF rank is not accepted by the Korean government. The only way you could truthfully declare Taekwondo as North Korean is if you believe the ITF propaganda, that the ITF is the true Taekwondo style, and Choi created Taekwondo himself. You would have to ignore the fact Choi created the ITF in Canada, outside of Korea. Before this he had developed his ITF forms (the tul) in Malaysia when he served as Korean ambassador there. So he developed the techniques in Malaysia and established ITF in Canada. Not Korea. Since you would be following a man, Choi, you could say he was born in North Korea and only went back to his homeland in Myongchon County, North Hamgyong province, North Korea, and this is the rightful place of Taekwondo, Choi’s birthplace. Except for the fact that when Choi was born in 1918 this area of Korea was simply part of the regular country of Korea. It was called “Meigawa-gun, Kankyo-hokudo Chosen” (Japanese words) as North Korea did not exist yet. Even more, this area was ruled by the Japanese Empire and considered part of their nation. Is Taekwondo Korean, or is it Japanese? You would have to ignore these facts to label North Korea as the true nation of Taekwondo.

Military Taekwondo, Traditional Taekwondo, Korean Taekwondo, North Korean Taekwondo, Traditional Korean Taekwondo, using various titles to make their Taekwondo sound better than yours…

When I started training in Taekwondo in the 1990’s people would explain that the difference between ITF and “WTF style” was that ITF was North Korean and “WTF style” was South Korean. Also, since Choi developed the Oh Do Kwan (the military kwan of South Korea), people would say that they trained in “military” Taekwondo and it is somehow more tough and hard. Groups claiming military Taekwondo were of course the ITF, but also the ATA (at least in the 80’s and 90’s). This made no sense, since South Korea used, and still uses, Kukkiwon Taekwondo in their military. This would also make “WTF style” (the Kukkiwon) military Taekwondo. But yes, North Korea teaches its military ITF Taekwon-Do. Another propagation was that ITF was “traditional” Taekwondo. That ITF was the traditional martial art of Korea, the first Teakwondo. This was before the MMA and Reality Based Self Defense caused a rift between what are termed “modern” martial arts and the older “traditional” martial arts such as seen from Asia. The term “traditional martial arts” was not a buzzword back in the 70’s to early 90’s and did not have the same meaning. The term “traditional” was often used by martial arts groups implying their organization or way of teaching a martial art is the traditional way or style as opposed to a newer version. As in the original way of training and the original style. So often times you would hear, ITF people claiming they do “Korean Taekwondo,” or “Military Taekwondo,” or “Traditional Taekwondo.”

Truthfully the Kukki-Taekwondo style is the style the military in Korea trains in. That would make it military Taekwondo. Yet civilians do not train in he same methods exactly as military, so no average citizen in any country can claim they are training in a military martial art unless they are a soldier in South Korea logically. Kukki-Taekwondo is also the traditional martial art of Korea, that would make it traditional Taekwondo. It is also the true Korean (as opposed to North Korean) style of Taekwondo. That makes WTF/Kukkiwon true Korean Taekwondo.

Choi gave legitimacy to North Korea…

With Choi claiming his Taekwon-Do was the true Korean Taekwondo, (as opposed to the south Korean Kukki/WTF not being Korean Taekwondo) he was giving North Korea legitimacy as the true Korea. The ITF has spread North Korean acceptance and sympathy through Choi’s teachings. This is immoral. With all of the human rights violations and suffering North Korea has dealt on its own people with its despotic dynasty supporting North Korea or trying to be diplomatic with them is a shameful thing. Choi’s spread of Juche love in his ITF also brings unnecessary and wrong criticism of South Korea and its policies as well as the United States. It gives North Korea the benefit of the doubt and tolerance. This can be seen in all of the “love fests” that are the diplomatic meetings and demonstrations in which a group of Americans (most often Taekwondo Times Magazine) petition for the North Korean Taekwon-Do Demonstration Team to come to their tournaments. I have also found out a local master instructor who is actually ranked in the Kukkiwon and runs a very large mcdojang in a city I used to live in invited the North Korea demo team as well. Of course large ITF tournaments invite them as well as if they are a special entity. The North Korean Demonstration Team is treated much like how the Korean Tigers or the Kukkiwon Demo Team is treated in the Kukki/WTF circles.

I believe there is absolutely no reason to support or try to be nice with North Korea because…they are evil! Acknowledging them gives them legitimacy and that is wrong. When I say “they” I don’t mean all of the peasents and starving people dying and those tortured to death in prison camps, I mean the North Korean elite and the leaders and brutal people in positions of power who have caused the deaths of untold millions and continue to threaten the peace and safety of South Korea and the entire world with threats of nuclear destruction. Also, the North Koreans are brainwashed to believe the Kims are gods. Asking for their demo team to perform at your event says that such ideology and brainwashing is acceptable.

Choi had tons of respect for both Kim Il Sung and Kim Jung Il…

Choi Hong Hi had a lot of respect for Kim Il Sung. So much respect that he decided it was absolutely necessary to create a black belt form with the unique Communist philosophy and ideology of “Kim Il Sungism.” He called the tul “Juche” and established it in 1986 in the official ITF curriculum.

Choi on the left holding hands with “the real Dr. Evil,” Kim Jung Il. It is so obvious Choi was a communist lover

Here is what the high ranking black belt form called Juche looks like. It is performed by a “super master world champion sine-wave lord”:

The Juche pose is the ready stance at the start and end of the form.

A side note…

Now on a side note, you know why I mentioned above how flashy this form was. Ridiculous flying scissor kicks, full leg-spin kick-extension, and balancing twirls etc…(can the average martial art student even perform these feats? Does being a black belt only qualify super athletic people without any physical disabilities?) A great thing about the Kukkiwon’s WTF approved poomsae creations are that they are techniques that the average person can do, or will be able to do with practice and they take in account the fact students may have disabilities or physical limitations. The moves are advanced enough to show serious skill, yet are not over the top and remain a basic concept for self defense at the black belt level and for the average person who obtains high dan rank. In WTF/Kukki-Taekwondo flashy kicks and twirls are reserved outside of poomsae and displayed by the physically gifted black belts, and it does not nullify the abilities of lesser gifted black belts. It is not a requirement to do a flying scissor kick or ballet twirls for rank, (but if you can do them then great, it is extra credit and desirable), but it seems that the ITF tries to make it a qualification for dan ranks by making such forms mandatory to learn for rank, yet the average ITF student I have seen cannot do these movements very well at all (now I know where the ATA got their ideas for their ridiculous looking forms, because the founders of the ATA were former ITF masters).

Another Side note, it is interesting that the form Toi Gye also contains the Juche stance/pose in the middle of the form, with the feet together close instead of shoulder width, but it is essentially the same thing and hands are placed in the same fashion. Apparently Choi was giving credence to Kim Il Sung before he ever created the Juche tul. Here is a video of the form look for the Juche pose at :25:

The communist Juche ideology in ITF…

Now if you look closely at the ready stance (chunbi stance) you will notice the pose has the fists on the waist and elbows stuck out. This stance is performed at the start and ending of the form. Here is a photo of General Choi posing in the Juche stance:

What is the reason for this stance? Is there a combat application? Absolutely not! It is simply thrown in there to honor Kim Il Sung, who is seen in many paintings, statues and other depictions in this position. Apparently, Kim Il Sung stood this way often and showed his strict authority and dominance as the leader of North Korea. Below is a painting of Kim Il Sung with his son (the real Dr. Evil) Kim Il Jung:

Left: Kim Il Sung in his Juche stance Right: Kim Jung Il (Dr. Evil)

 

   Left: Kim Jung Il         Right: Kim Il Sung in his Juche stance

It is the Juche stance! There are also 1 arm variations of this stance seen in large statues:

Kim Jung Il also is depicted like his father in a Juche stance:

So you get the point. Choi taught this way of standing at ready position for the Juche tul. It is exactly how Kim Il Sung and then his son Kim Jung Il stood often. They are depicted in propaganda and art to display power, dominance, confidence, and control. Choi, calling his tul Juche and making the ready stance before you start with the hands placed in this way, is a direct reference to Kim Il Sung. It was put in the form so that he will be honored by all ITF black belts. Choi wanted to honor the dictator, fully supporting his Juche policies that have left North Koreans starving and dying for more than half a century. With Choi Hong Hi’s influence and the spreading of ITF Taekwon-Do all over the world he has spread communist sympathies and interests. The references of this evil in the ITF are absolutely clear and cannot be denied.

Now we have dorky ITF ranked white guys in America who think they are cool posing in the communist dictator’s stance in front of South Korean and United States flags:

 

Because it makes sense to stand in a communist pose in front of 2 flags representing democracy, freedom, liberty, and capitalism. As if the South Korean flag represents ITF…

Any freedom loving patriots of America, Korea, or other democracies should not be practicing and promoting a martial art style that supports communist dictators. A lot of ITF practitioners ignore the truth, or are too prideful to drop the ITF and join the Kukkiwon. A lot of it has to do with not being a master, or keeping their rank if they leave to the Kukkiwon. But if someone wants to participate in the true Korean martial art, wants to be enriched by true Korean culture, and wants to stop doing crazy flashy tul and more reasonable poomsae and be better at self defense, and stop supporting evil North Korean dictators and the millions of dead caused by them, they should join the Kukkiwon. The absolute least thing they should do beyond that is to quit practicing Juche, which at least 1 or 2 ITF groups (there are 3 separate ITF groups due to ego-maniacal, in-fighting between leaders after Choi’s death) have either quit teaching Juche, or simply renamed it. But for the one who renamed it, hopefully they also stopped the “Juche pose” and replaced it with a standard chunbi stance or something else.

The majority of martial arts enthusiasts who train simply want to work on technique, stay in shape, and learn to fight better. The problem with the ITF is they keep politicking and have become a cult of personality for Choi Hong Hi. He is kind of like the original dictator of ITF. Choi seemed to be more concerned with “his style” being represented the way he wanted it, to make sure his forms were performed his way, and to make sure everyone acknowledged he is the god of Taekwondo. The Oh Do Kwan which he founded in the South Korean military literally means “School of My Way” as in Choi’s way. This says a lot! He literally did express that his name was “Taekwon-Do” which was given to him by God. So God gave him the name Taekwon-Do and we have to recognize it. He was always concerned with people following him and doing what he says. At the end of his life he was quoted on the ITF website stating that he is the man with the most followers in the entire world. ITF is all about politics and being part of an organization. It is not so much as training to be a martial arts expert and knowing how to fight. The most important thing to most in the ITF is if you believe in Choi, not so much as being good fighters or self defense experts. If they were concerned about combat techniques they wouldn’t be as closed minded as they are and would keep progressing in various techniques and concepts. It seems once Choi died that is as far as ITF will go. Unfortunately as Choi got older he not only fully embraced North Korean communism, but added ridiculous theories such as “sine-wave” in his style. It made ITF Taekwon-Do worse. With his death basically everyone in ITF basically will not change much. Stances in forms won’t change, self defense ideas won’t change much either. Heck their uniforms really haven’t changed either! It’s like they are stuck in the late 70’s. Choi never seemed to allow individual freedoms within ITF. In the WTF/Kukkiwon of course uniforms most of the time are “WTF approved” yet there are so many styles and brands you can buy. The ITF basically has isolationist policies within martial arts much like North Korea. It is no wonder. The Kukkiwon allows for individual freedom, dojang liberty and constantly progresses and develops technique for better training as knowledge and science increases. Taekwondo is about fighting, to train as a martial artist and develop yourself. ITF is always about Choi and whatever of the 3 ITF groups you belong to want to promote. ITF exists for itself and Choi and not for martial arts as a whole or the individual. This is wrong. True Korean Taekwondo as promoted by the Kukkiwon is about self defense and the individual to develop as a martial artist in their own being. This is the way it should be and this is why Taekwondoin should affiliate with the Kukkiwon and not ITF.

It is 100% clear that Choi and the ITF embraced the axis of evil that is North Korea. It cannot be denied that ITF Taekwondo supports North Korea. ITF is offensive in its sympathetic view of North Korea and tolerance of Juche communism. Many American and South Korean soldiers died defending Korea and trying to suppress communism in Asia in one of the most pointless conflicts Kim Il Sung started which was the Korean war. Only a maniacal and evil person would cause such a war only to not gain anything from it but death. It was much like the result of Saddam Hussein’s war with Iran where nothing was gained but death. No land was gained or any resources in the Korean war. At least America made sure the original land was regained or else the entire peninsula would be ruled by the Kims today. South Korea is a nation of progress and freedom and this should be expressed in Taekwondo.

 

Choi Hong Hi Honored By North Korea During Anti America Month

        By now if you have regularly read this blog you will know it in no way seeks to be diplomatic to other Taekwondo groups and fully supports the Kukkiwon an also is a freedom loving, American martial arts blog. So this blog post is going to reinforce that by bashing Choi Hong Hi and the ITF. The White Dragon Dojang does NOT apologize either. If you don’t like this then stop reading it, and don’t waste your time posting your disdain in the comments section either. You will just create fodder for the LOLs.

The month of June in North Korea is basically dedicated to hating the USA and promoting the death of America and it’s South Korean collaborators. They shout for the destruction of the “gangster US imperialists.” It is “hate America month,” right now, but the official title is called “Struggle Against U.S. Imperialism Month.” It is the 65th anniversary of the Korean War, and about a week ago in this same month was a memorial for the late General Choi Hong Hi, the founder of the International Taekwon-Do Federation. I was informed by this memorial by a regular reader who sent me the link to the following video:

Historically, Choi was in the ROK (South Korea) military and fought against the communists during the war. Later, because of his ego damaged by the fact a lot of people did not like his ideas or want him to be the sole boss of Taekwondo, he defected to North Korea and brought his version of Taekwondo to them with his top students. No being able to return to South Korea he resided in Canada and set up the ITF headquarters. Choi brought martial arts skills, through his students, who taught North Korea combat techniques and his ITF tul (forms). Of course South Korea did not think it was a good idea that one of their former generals should bring martial arts teachings to their enemies that can be used against South Korean soldiers, and viewed him as a traitor. And rightly so.

Why ANYONE who loves freedom, loves Korean people, and especially, if they are Americans or from any freedom loving western nation would support the ITF and join them is beyond me. Knowing the history of Choi an ITF should give someone the sense to understand that it is immoral to be a part of something that supports North Korea. The philosophy of North Korean evil, “Juche” (the communist doctrine of the evil dictator Kim Il Sung) is all over ITF and used as propaganda to soften people’s view of North Korea and to have disdain or a little resentment toward South Korea. This is made apparent just by having conversations with people who have been indoctrinated by ITF Taekwondo history and ideas.

Why any Kukki Taekwondo practitioner or leader would ever want to be diplomatic with the ITF and give them a voice or associate with them and work together with them is also beyond me. It is counter productive. Honestly, it is my bold opinion that the ITF needs to just die out and allow Taekwondo to be unified and progress. The ITF not only struggled against the KTA, Kukkiwon and WTF, it had much internal fighting that 4 groups came out of it all claiming to be the true Taekwondo (3 separate groups claim to be the true ITF, and the other one calls itself Global Taekwondo Federation). ITF holds Taekwondo back with annoying arguments (especially online with ITF people around the world who post on blogs comments sections, youtube videos etc.), the fact their uniforms look stupid and seem to have never been updated since the 1960’s, the fact the sine wave concept which is not based on real physics or science and holds the progression of serious techniques back, and other nonsense and shenanigans. Yes, I am being humorous but also serious. The ITF needs to disappear and so does communism. It is the 21st century.

Notice in the above video that all of the glory and honor of Choi is North Korean specific and gives their regime glory. All of the flags in photos are of the North Korean flag and appear to show Choi acknowledging them as the true Korea. What do you see in every ITF dojang though? You see a South Korean flag. What Taekwondo do South Koreans practice and promote? Kukkiwon/WTF Taekwondo, they do not support ITF or acknowledge it. Culturally, Taekwondo in Korea is Kukkiwon and that is their martial arts cultural identity. So it is illogical for ITF dojang to use South Korean flags when we all know Choi would be pleased if you would fly the North Korean flag. Why don’t ITF dojangs just fly the communist flag and be straight up with us?

General Choi definitely has his place in the beginnings of Taekwondo history: being the force behind the “Taekwondo” name we use and being the first KTA president. But that is not enough to give him the glory and honor the North Koreans give him for Taekwondo. He was a trouble maker, a jerk, a schemer, and problematic for Taekwondo and he had to go. That is why he was told to leave and given the permission to just go do his own thing an start his own ITF Taekwondo. He did this but then decided to go to North Korea and get praised by them and betray his countrymen and soldiers. He was never a true master of martial arts or given rank above 2nd dan because of skill. All we know is his highest rank in Karate was 2nd dan before the formation of Taekwondo. Any high rank he received was strictly honorary because of his influence as a general. I think this is why he created such wacky forms as the higher up ITF forms seem to get ridiculous and illogical. Then he created the sine wave concept and started another annoying war within Taekwondo which is based on incorrect physics. Now people can argue forever about why the sine wave ius better and makes forms cooler and more powerful, while the rest of Taekwondo people shake our heads at the stupidity. Obviously, he had no clue about what is going to work in a fight or what is good in martial arts.

Who else is sick of annoying, dorky white guys as seen in the above video that want to sympathize with North Korea and actually think it is okay to visit there just to give praise to Choi. The type of guys who want to feel special and be a part of some special Asian club and will listen to anything the Asian masters say. These kinds of guys are all over martial arts like Kung Fu or “Ninjutsu.” You know those white guys who are nerds and do not have critical thinking and believe in martial arts myths and hand on to every word some important Asian martial arts guy says. These white guys for Taekwondo are the ones who believe in the General Choi myth, that he solely is the father of Taekwondo and worthy of our worship and honor even to the point of ignoring all of the atrocities and human rights violations that North Korea has committed every day since its inception in 1945. It is beyond reason unless they actually love communism. These are basically the same guys who run Taekwondo Times Magazine or think it is a great Taekwondo publication full of all kinds of knowledge…yeah….

Interview With Master Dong-Hee Lee

 

        When you see a Taekwondo master from Korea demonstrating Taekwondo techniques from poomsae in plausible self defense maneuvers it really motivates the Taekwondo fighter in me. It pumps me up and inspires me to keep developing combat techniques and believing in Taekwondo. Master Dong-Hee Lee is such a master and I found his videos on YouTube recently. I do not believe his channel has many views and he seems to be rarely known. I want to change this and introduce him to my readers so more and more people will see his execution of techniques and fighting concepts and believe that Taekwondo is a fighting art, not simply a sport or performance art. His channel deserves a lot of views so please make sure to check it out and subscribe to his channel.

 


Dong Hee Lee self defense concepts

        I was able to interview master Lee over e-mail. He is a very approachable person and responds to messages and was excited to do this interview. Translation was difficult since I do not speak Korean and he does not speak English fluently yet, but we managed to make it work. I hope you all enjoy it and learn more about this interesting man.

 

Interview:

 

WHITE DRAGON: What’s your name? Where and when were you born? Please introduce yourself.

 

MASTER LEE: Nice to meet you, my name is Dong-hee Lee. I was born in South Korea in 1988. 

 

WHITE DRAGON: How did you get involved in martial arts and how old were you? What made you want to start training? Please list your training history and be as specific as possible. Who were your instructors in the past? Any notable characters?

 

MASTER LEE: I started Taekwondo when I was 5 years old. At that time almost every kid had to go to Taekwondo, even now. I was one of those kids, but unlike the ones who do it because they “have to,” in my case, I started training because I always had envied strength and martial arts. Even now I continue my Taekwondo training and have graduated from Kyunghee University as a Taekwondo major. In other words, I have been training for 23 years in total.
For Taekwondo, I had been taught by a world championship gold medalist teacher (sabum), under his guidance as a sparring athlete for 8 years. Also, I was a poomsae athlete and demonstration performer on the Korean Tigers demo team. 
In between, I’ve also learned Judo and Karate for a bit. After I’ve grown to be an adult I have been trained as an MMA athlete under the guidance of the best Korean Muay Thai athlete, and worldwide Muay Thai fighter Chi-Bin Im. 
Also, I’ve practiced Korea’s traditional martial art (mudo) which is called Hyeondongmu. It is a martial art that incorporates the use of ki.
Not long ago, I had also achieved the instructor certificate for Systema, which is a Russian bodyguard martial art, and Krav Maga as well, which is an Israeli bodyguard martial art. 
The person who taught me Systema in Korea was D.K Yoo (Dae-Kyeong Yoo). he had not only covered Systema but also Boxing. All sorts of Chinese martial arts and weapon martial arts which he had also taught me. 
 
WHITE DRAGON: What are your ranks, certifications or titles in martial arts? Do you have tournament titles?
 
MASTER LEE: When I was a poomsae athlete I had won a lot of gold medals. In 2006 I was nominated by the Korea Taekwondo Association as rank no.1 of poomsae out of all elementary, middle school, high school students, and adult players. 
Before in 2004 I won 1st place in the Korea Open World Poomsae Championship. 
In Taekwondo I am ranked 5th dan under the Kukkiwon and as for Systema and Krav Maga, I have obtained instructor qualifications for both. I also have Kickboxing certification of Muay Thai/K-1 Instructor from WAKO Korea. 
During my time as a martial art athlete, my record for Muay Thai was 3 victory, 1 draw with 2 KO’s out of 4 matches. 

Taekwondo victory after Muay Thai fight.

 

WHITE DRAGON: How long have you owned your school in Korea? Is it your first dojang that you have operated? Where are you located exactly? What classes do you offer?

 

MASTER LEE: I’ve entered Kyung Hee University located in South Korea in 2007 as a Taekwondo major and have graduated this year. The very first Taekwondo major that has been created.
I had made a club on actual combat and had been instructing for a few years and also let my club mates take part in games.
I currently don’t own my own dojang but I’m planning to next year.
If I get to own my dojang I would like to teach mainly adults on actual Taekwondo that can compete against any other martial arts. 

Kickboxing practice

WHITE DRAGON: Have you ever had to use Taekwondo in a real life fight or self defense situation? Have you ever been given a challenge by someone who wanted to fight you? If so how did you deal with it?

 

MASTER LEE: When I was living in South America a few years ago I ran into two black robbers. I chased them away by kicking them in the private spot. But if they had weapons it would have been hard. Luckily for me they didn’t. 
I myself am not of the personality who likes random fighting, so whenever someone tries to provoke me I usually apologize first to avoid a fight. Most situations there is almost no chance for me to get into a fight. People in Korea say that maybe it’s because I have quite a huge physique and my fierce looks. 
When I was a martial art athlete I had a lot of fights myself and most of the time Taekwondo had been a great help. Recently, I had trained a few martial art athletes and had sent them to participate in matches.

WHITE DRAGON: Why were you living in South America?

MASTER LEE: I was in Ecuador doing volunteer work for 2 years. I was teaching Taekwondo to the people there. 
 
WHITE DRAGON: Is taekwondo a dangerous system used for killing?

 

MASTER LEE: All martial arts contain the system for killing and giving great injuries to opponents. It is just as well with Taekwondo. Most people (including taekwondoin) don’t really know it, but deadly skills do exist in Taekwondo. However the purpose for all martial arts are not specifically for killing people, but defending yourself.

 

WHITE DRAGON: What was the Taekwondo scene like in Korea when you were growing up? How is training different today in most dojangs compared to then?

 

MASTER LEE: I feel that children in the recent era are really blessed. They can learn whatever they want. It was different for me when I was a kid. At that time even the internet wasn’t as well developed as it is right now. Nowadays, kids have to learn everything that they can learn. The current dojang of Korea have become more focused on physical education and recreation for kids, but I believe the trend will change to martial arts dojang for adults.
Back in the day most of the dojangs had armed us with strong training and discipline for our body and heart. But nowadays most dojangs don’t train students as it was before.

WHITE DRAGON: What is your opinion on the modern state of Taekwondo? Many feel that Taekwondo has lost much of its combative nature these days. Is it true?

MASTER LEE: I think that Taekwondo has lost a lot of its combative nature. To be exact, a lot of its nature has been latent. On the other hand, Taekwondo sparring has been developed a lot and by itself it is very combative and a very effective combat style. However, Taekwondo contains more techniques that need the application of the whole body.
If such skills become revived I believe Taekwondo will be a stronger martial art.

Dong Hee Lee

 
WHITE DRAGON: What is your opinion of the ‘taekwondo-dance trend’? The Korean Tigers really promote it and have made it popular all over the world. I would like to know your thoughts on that?

 

MASTER LEE: Adding in dance or other elements to Taekwondo can be said to be as entertainment. It is another trend to the Korean culture itself. I think the Korean Tigers had done a great job in promoting and making Taekwondo famous around the world. It is a bit sad that the actual combat style of Taekwondo couldn’t be introduced, but it is the truth that they have contributed to making the name Taekwondo as well-known as it is now. But for people who don’t really know, they may carry doubt or misunderstandings towards the sport and style itself.
Such traditional taekwondoin must put forth an effort to display this. Tony Jaa is a Thailand action movie star who was cast in the movie “The Protector” and other Muay Thai movies. He has added acrobatic moves to the martial art for movie fight scenes. Even so, nobody will say that Muay Thai is weak in actual combat. This is because Muay Thai has already been recognized for its veracity in many MMA matches. 
As for Taekwondo, its veracity hasn’t been recognized much foreignly, so by the adding of acrobatics, dance moves, and entertainment elements, such as how the Korean Tiger’s display Taekwondo, it easily produces misunderstandings of the martial art. Therefore, I think of it as a cultural aspect of Korea and we have to keep the idea of “taekwondo-dance” in such a light for what it is, but at the same time we have to focus more on the traditional values and martial art (mudo) side of Taekwondo itself.

Practicing for a demo

WHITE DRAGON: What was it like touring with the Korean Tigers? What kinds of performances did you do? How is their martial arts philosophy as a whole compared to you individually? 

MASTER LEE: I was a Korean Tiger member for 4 years. I never did Taekwondo dancing. I focused mainly on kicking such as kyuk pa and poomsae techniques. Their philosophy is just about performance art and not actual martial arts. For me, my philosophy is about martial arts and not the same as theirs. During my time with the K-Tigers I was able to visit several countries such as China, India, Qatar just to name a few. It was a fun experience but I decided I really want true martial arts and to further Taekwondo as a martial art which is different from their focus on performance art. 

WHITE DRAGON: What is your opinion on the International Taekwon-Do Federation?

 

MASTER LEE: I think the International Taekwon-Do Federation itself is a magnificent fraction of Taekwondo. Especially, the fundamentals of ‘sign wave’ is special and remarkable. 

K-Tiger’s promotional photo

WHITE DRAGON: It is said that martial arts change people’s lives. In what was has martial arts training influenced your life? What can it do for other people?

 

MASTER LEE: By strengthening your body and mind it can bring help to one’s livelihood. It gives you confidence and can let you protect yourself and the people around you. Also, it deepens the understanding of other’s pain, since pain accompanies through the process of training in a martial art. Anyhow, I believe through training it secretly influences others and gives out good influence. 

 

WHITE DRAGON: Who are some Taekwondo masters that inspire you? Also, do you have heroes in other styles of martial arts as well?

 

MASTER LEE: I respect all of my teachers who have taught me since I was inspired by all of them. They have taught me different martial arts throughout my life.

 

WHITE DRAGON: What does it take to become an instructor? What qualifications would you suggest? Do you have any tips for people wanting to start their own gyms and become full time Taekwondo teachers?

 

MASTER LEE: At first the person must have good skills. There must always be something to teach. They must also have leadership skills in order to forward the things that one wants to teach. Not just that but during the process in transmitting skills the teacher must have a personality that other people can respect. However, I currently don’t operate any dojang so it is hard for me to give any tips to other masters.

 

WHITE DRAGON: How did you get the idea to join YouTube and begin uploading videos? Do you have any specific future plans with YouTube or video production?

 

MASTER LEE: The idea of making filming a video just popped up one day so I uploaded it onto YouTube. I’m planning to keep uploading videos of my skill system of techniques and poomsae interpretations and application, etc. 
In Korea I have already uploaded through blogs and stuff, especially the response on Facebook was really good. 

 

WHITE DRAGON: How important is poomsae practice to you and your philosophy? 

 

MASTER LEE: Poomsae was a gift that was given to me. Through poomsae competitions I could ultimately increase my ego in Korea and throughout the world. However as an aspect of my philosophy it wasn’t important. It only was a great help for training to master techniques and control the body and mind.

 

A focused Lee preparing before a poomsae event back in his high school days.

 

WHITE DRAGON: Do you enjoy Olympic Taekwondo sparring?
 
MASTER LEE: After my 8 years as a Taekwondo athlete I don’t especially enjoy it any more. 

Tying a student’s glove for kickboxing training

 

WHITE DRAGON: Do you have any final shout outs, statements, or feelings to express? If so feel free to mention them!
 
MASTER LEE: Thank you for such an opportunity to give me the chance to have such an interview. I’m really grateful for your interest in me.  

*For more information on Master Dong Hee Lee you can visit his YouTube channel:
Be sure to subscribe!
And his Facebook page:

Interview With Master In Choul Jeong

        In Choul Jeong is a great Taekwondo master of our day who has been very influential with advancing Taekwondo techniques. He is on the education committee in the Kukkiwon. He is the author of Hand Techniques of Taekwondo for Actual Fighting written for the Korean Taekwondo Association (KTA). I found out about master Jeong through YouTube last year when I was looking up hand techniques for real Taekwondo fighting. I was looking up videos for Taekwondo and self defense. I stumbled upon this video:

When I saw that I was impressed and felt really encouraged to keep training hand techniques in Taekwondo. He even emphasizes use of the kwon go (Korean translation of the Japanese term makiwara, which is the board with rope tied around it used for the hitting of the fist) for hand conditioning, something Taekwondo people have forgotten which used to be one of the essential training tools in the old days. Now days it seems only karateka use it while taekwondoin (who came from Karate and used to use it) are busy training for tournament sparring without much use of hands.

Master Jeong also makes videos showing applications for poomsae. He shows what the movements mean and why you are training them, and how they relate to self defense. He keeps putting out one awesome video after another. I think more people need to know about his videos and subscribe to his channel. It is awesome to see Korean Taekwondo masters training for the purpose of fighting and self defense and not only doing demo’s or Taekwondo-dance which seems to be 99% of the videos you see online today.

I was given the opportunity by master Jeong to do an interview with him so he could tell us all more about his training background and martial arts philosophy! If you have not checked Master Jeong’s YouTube channel please do so! Make sure to like his videos and subscribe to his channel!

Enjoy the interview:

WHITE DRAGON: What’s your name? Where were you born? Please introduce yourself.

 MASTER JEONG: My name is In Choul Jeong, but my Face book page’s name is “Taekwondo master Jeong In Choul” (Korean style).  I was born in Seoul, South Korea. I teach Taekwondo to foreign people at the World Taekwondo Culture Expo, World Youth Taekwondo Camp and at my dojang.  Nice to speak to you all.

WHITE DRAGON: How did you get involved in martial arts and how old were you? What made you want to start training? Please list your training history and be as specific as possible. Who were your instructors in the past? Any notable characters?

MASTER JEONG: You are asking me many things at once! Haha! I started training Taekwondo at 6 years old. My father was a Grandmaster and so his Dojang was my playground. His name is “Soon Kyu Jeong”and he is at the level of 9th dan. He is a former vice president of Odokwan and he taught many students. One of them is Grandmaster Hwang (Kukkiwon Director, Instructor). Master Hwang is also my master. I think I am a lucky guy because I’ve gotten chances to learn from many great teachers: Grandmaster In Sik Hwang, Grandmaster Ik Pil Kang (World Champion at poomsae), Grandmaster Jae Ro Ahn (President of Cheongjihjoe), as well as many teachers in other martial arts. They are all my masters in my life.

3rd place poomsae division at World Hanmadang, standing with his father Master Soon Kyu Jeong

WHITE DRAGON: What are your ranks, certifications, or titles in martial arts? Do you have tournament titles?

MASTER JEONG: Taekwondo 6th Dan Kukkiwon

Kendo – 5th dan 

Kyungho Moosool (martial art for body guards) – 5th dan

Member of Kukkiwon Education Committee

Instructor of World Taekwondo Culture Expo

Instructor of World Youth Taekwondo Camp

Author of Hand Techniques of Taekwondo for Actual Fighting (KTA, ANIBIG,2013)

Author of Textbook for Kukkiwon Instructors (WTA, 2014)

International poomsae competition held during the Korean Open, 1st place

Taekwondo poomsae competition held on the honor of KTA president, 1st place in senior department

Taekwondo poomsae competition held on the honor of KITF president, 2nd place 

Besides Taekwondo, I have trained in Boxing, Muay Thai, Kendo, Kyungho Moosool,etc..

Master Jeong with foreign students

WHITE DRAGON: What is Kyungho Moosool and who is allowed to learn it? What techniques and concepts does it entail?

MASTER JEONG: Kyungho Moosool is a Korean martial art for body guards. It trains a person to protect VIP’s. I do not teach this even though I am 5th dan, but it was very helpful to study real fight Taekwondo. The president of Kyngho Moosol is named Jae Sool Byun. He was my father’s student and he has earned over 20 dan ranks from many styles of martial arts. He is the president of the Korean Special Kyungho Moosool Association in Korea. I received my certification in 2004. If someone wants to become a professional body guard he can apply to this program, but he should hold a rank of at least 3rd dan in some other martial art style before he will even be considered. There are many techniques and systems about defensive automobile driving, tactical firearms, and weapons disarms training in that program. They teach the principle of body guarding and all that it entails to protect a VIP. 

WHITE DRAGON: What is Cheonjihoe?

MASTER JEONG: One of the top poomsae teams in Korea. Master Ik Pil Kang was 1st president of Cheongjihoe, and I learned poomsae from him. The word means “the people who have pure minds.” 

WHITE DRAGON: Have you ever had to use Taekwondo in a real life fight or self defense situation? Have you ever been given a challenge by someone who wanted to fight you? If so how did you deal with it?

 MASTER JEONG: Yes, When I was a boy, I had so many fights and used skills of Taekwondo (It’s such a shame, I was so childish). Apchagi (front kick) to the stomach is a very useful skill and sometimes I used dwit chagi (back kick) to finish an aggressive enemy. When I was in my 20’s, I worked as a manager in my uncle’s night club. There were so many fights especially at Friday night. I usually tried to break up the fights and some guys tried to punch me. But I parried all their punches with steps and blocked the attacks with Taekwondo skills. After that I suppressed them easily. Actually, small and fast action is very important in a real fight situation, not fancy action.

WHITE DRAGON: What is your opinion on the modern state of Taekwondo? Many feel that Taekwondo has lost much of its combative nature these days. Is this true?

MASTER JEONG:  Yes it is. I want to answer with this famous quote, “You win some, you lose some.” Boxers can’t use kicks in a boxing match, so their punching techniques have been developed brilliantly and skillful. Likewise, we as Taekwondo competitors can’t punch in the face in a Taekwondo match, so the kicking techniques of Taekwondo are the best they have ever been now because they have been developed over time just as boxing developed punches in their sport. 

However, while we’ve developed great kicks because of sport, many of us have unfortunately lost the development of hand techniques. Sadly, many of us don’t train the hand techniques of Taekwondo anymore which causes many people feel think that Taekwondo is just a sport and is not effective for self defense.

But I want to say “The essence of Taekwondo” is a martial art for actual fighting. I will quote from my book Hand Techniques of Taekwondo for Actual Fighting (KTA, ANIBIG,2013):

The 1st and 2nd class Master Course Textbook (for Kukkiwon Taekwondo Master Training Course attendees) says the same thing – ‘Taekwondo is a martial art for knocking down enemies.’ (Kukkiwon Master Course Textbook). This is very important and we should remember this.

Hand Techniques Of Taekwondo For Actual Fighting book

The number of hand Technique is larger than the number of kicking in Taekwondo, nevertheless we barely use hand techniques in sparring training or a match. So I have intensely studied the techniques of Taekwondo for actual fighting and have written the book Hand Techniques of Taekwondo for Actual Fighting (KTA, ANIBIG,2013) with great masters Jaeyoung Um and Jae Ro Ahn. I have translated the book into English and you may be able to buy it online in a few months. (Special thanks to Master Andy Jeffries for supervising). Search for it on Amazon and other book outlets in the near future. 

Demonstrating accurate poomsae at a clinic for foreign students

WHITE DRAGON:  What is your opinion on the International Taekwondo Federation (ITF)?

MASTER JEONG: I respect Grand master “Choi Hong Hi” the founder of ITF. They  use  punches  to  the  face  in  competition  sparring and  they have been trying to keep Taekwondo as a martial art. I think that’s good.

WHITE DRAGON: It is said that martial arts change people’s lives. In what way has martial arts training influenced your life? What can it do for other people?

MASTER JEONG: People learn patience, concentration, courtesy, and manners while training Taekwondo. And so did I. The real power of education is changing a person. Not only in terms of combative martial arts, but also in terms of personal edification. Taekwondo is a very powerful martial art.

 WHITE DRAGON: What is your opinion of the “Taekwondo-dance trend”? The Korean Tigers really promote it and have made it popular all over the world. I would like to know your thoughts on that.

MASTER JEONG: I think of it positively and I like K-Tigers team. But I think balance and sequence are very important. If some masters teach Taekwon-dance to a white belt student, it is not proper. If someone trains Taekwon-dance over 30 minutes in a one hour training session, this is not proper also.

Kendo master

WHITE DRAGON: What is your opinion of mixed martial arts, and how does Taekwondo today fit in the world wide trend of MMA? Is MMA something to embrace as a Taekwondoin? Do you have any favorite fighters in the world of MMA or Kickboxing?

MASTER JEONG: I really like MMA. My favorite fighter is Ronda Rousey. Many MMA fighters and kickboxers are learning Taekwondo’s kicks and trying to apply it to their game. I am very proud of it. And I think Taekwondo masters should learn the skills of other martial arts and study them for upgrading. To develop something, we need flexibility, not a fixed idea, so I think “embrace” is an excellent word. Sometimes I do free sparring with MMA fighters or Kickboxers here and there. It is very helpful to understand more about martial arts.

Boxing practice

WHITE DRAGON: How important is poomsae practice to you and your philosophy?

MASTER JEONG: I learn the principles of body movement from poomsae, and I have been trying to apply the skills of poomsae to a real life situation. You can find my videos on YouTube and Facebook (search “Master Jeong In Choul”) demonstrating poomsae applications and scenario based self defense training with the movements found in Taekwondo forms. I believe that people will find the essence of Taekwondo in poomsae.

Taekwondo fit!

 

WHITE DRAGON: Do you enjoy Olympic Taekwondo sparring?

MASTER JEONG: Yes I do. There is an advantage in Olympic style techniques to learn and we should not ignore it. I think that a real master should be skilled with both parts (poomsae and kyorugi) and should be able to apply poomsae into actual fighting. When I was in elementary school I had won a few medals from national competition. I also did sparring in tournaments all the time when I was a middle school student. Unfortunately, my parents did not agree that I should be an athlete and instead made me focus on studying in high school. So my Taekwondo focus turned towards poomsae training and hoshinsool study. Then in college I trained sparring and usually competed. I was a sparring champion in the university union division. I still enjoy sparring with various people here and there from time to time. I just never compete anymore and focus on self defense concepts and poomsae applications.

WHITE DRAGON: Do you have any final shout outs, statements, or feelings to express? If so feel free to mention them!

MASTER JEONG: It was my pleasure to do this interview, thank you for asking me to do it! 

WHITE DRAGON: I appreciate the chance to interview you thank you!

MASTER JEONG: You’re welcome! Good bye!

*For more information on Master Jeong In Chul follow his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Jeonginchoul

and subscribe to his YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCy-Jg_befA1wq6eWnTSVz2Q

 Be sure to buy his book Hand Techniques of Taekwondo for Actual Fighting (KTA, ANIBIG,2013). It comes out in English this year! Look for it on Amazon!