Posts Tagged ‘taekwondo for MMA’

When Will The MMA Community Get It? It Is Time To Start Hiring Taekwondo Striking Coaches At Your Gyms!

        The last UFC Fight Night showed a one sided beatdown of MMA legend BJ Penn who is a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu prodigy. In this case, Taekwondo actually defeated Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Hard to believe I know! Many probably won’t admit it. BJ Penn could not keep on him or do anything but get hit and evaded.

Rodriguez threw a variety of kicks including a tornado round kick that bashed BJ pretty hard even though he had his arm blocking his face you could tell it still hurt. The video doe snot show the full fight, but even a hopping side kick was thrown that connected.

It is about time that the MMA community stops being biased towards Taekwondo and stops the nonsense claims that it doesn’t work when it clearly does. It is time to start giving jobs to Taekwondo masters and coaches who know the Taekwondo striking game very well and ca benefit your gyms. It is ridiculous not to. A Taekwondo striking coach deserves full respect and should be teaching fighters along side Muay Thai coaches and Boxing coaches. There is no excuse not to. Taekwondo should be equally respected as a serious skillset to teach fighters for MMA and self defense. There are going to be more beat downs like this over time and have been in the past. Taekwondo is dynamic and offers so many angles and ranges of kicking that Muay Thai does not. Taekwondo people have a new mind and idea to teach your fighters new techniques.

Stop the biased hatred of Taekwondo and start being open minded. MMA has progressed beyond telegraphed heavy kicks and boxing.

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Jose Aldo Broken Rib From Back Kick And Out Of UFC 189 Is From Stupid Training Practices

        The terrible news of Jose Aldo, the current UFC featherweight champion, receiving a broken rib from his idiot training partner Alcides Nunes who used a back kick in practice sparring that cracked Aldo’s rib is aggravating for fight fans who were given tons of hype of his previously upcoming fight against Conor McGregor. Now Chad Mendes, a boring wrestler is going to take Aldo’s place (uuuugh! Lay and pray fest). The reason for this broken rib is because of the ignorant ways many MMA gyms practice. Their ignorant ideas of “super tough training” seems to always cause injuries all over the MMA world. Even Cane Velasquez the now former UFC heavy weight champion did not even fight for 2 long years because of injuries at his AKA gym.

        This fight was going to be Jose Aldo who is pretty much a puncher and grappler to fight Conor McGregor who is a pretty decent striker who uses boxing and kicks from Taekwondo. McGregor has an ITF Taekwondo background and uses back kicks often and other kicks with his boxing skills. This was going to be an interesting fight. But of course as is common in MMA hyped fights an injury keeps the fans from seeing what they were told they wanted to see from months and months of intense marketing and “bad blood” between the two.

“The biggest featherweight fight ever? NOT ANYMORE!!!!

Now it’s just a unimportant “interim championship” fight…

        The truth is Jose Aldo’s injury should never have happened (obvious) and the fact it did happen only points us to the fact they have idiots at his gym who have no clue how to carefully train with someone and work on techniques with a proper and safe sparring partner. Chael Sonnen recently commented about the situation of Aldo’s injury and his training partner,

You’ve got to have training partners you can trust. I could be sparring with a guy and he forgot his mouthpiece, it wouldn’t matter. I’m not going to loosen his tooth, ever. If he goes with me, he’s going to leave in the same condition that he showed up in. He can trust me. Those are the kind of guys that you want to be working out with.

This is a very true statement that a lot of MMA gyms don’t seem to understand and allow too much ego and meatheaded jock behavior to injure may of their gym members. I know this for a fact from training at an MMA gym before. A friend of mine had his rib cracked from an moronic wrestler with an ego problem who went for a very hard takedown. People get injured all the time at these kinds of gyms. The problem is MMA has adopted the ignorant attitude that many boxing gyms have historically had that a person needs to fight really hard in sparring and get beat up to prove he is tough or man enough to be worthy to teach or given any attention. This nonsense philosophy loses so many potentially good fighters and martial artists that COULD be trained if given proper training. Not all people can just right away fight like a warrior, it has to be trained in them and taught often. People need to slow up and spar slow, work technique, not be hit so hard right away. Over time they can use harder contact. Not everyone is game to go hardcore in sparring and get hit hard. Beginners need to build confidence and bravery over time for that to happen. Then when someone is tough enough to handle it there is seriously no point in sparring all the way with full contact every night, especially if someone is a top athlete who needs to avoid getting hurt before a bout.

Traditional martial arts in my opinion is the best way to train a fighter or any kind of martial artist. There is a step-by-step process and concern for the student is given and they tale safe steps to get where they need to be. If MMA gyms stopped following the boxing theory of “proving your worth” a lot more martial artists could come out of their gyms who would be great fighters and would not want to quit. MMA is also more intense than boxing with kicks, elbows, knees, grappling and submissions. It is way more dangerous than boxing with a lot m,ore kinds of injuries. MMA training needs to be done safely.

Chael Sonnen also said,

Accidents happen. This could have been an accident. But it was a spinning kick to the midsection. That’s a very hard strike to control – it’s the same reason we don’t throw elbows in practice. They’re just too hard to control, and if one gets away, even a light one, it can cut your opponent and he’s going to need stitches. There are some things you just don’t do on a partner; you save it for the heavy bag. I’m very confused as to how this even happened 10 days before a title fight.

I will have to say while I understand his concerns about elbows, his is flat out wrong about the “spinning” back kick. Taekwondo practitioners have trained all kinds of kicks, especially the back kick without too many injuries. It totally possible to practice sparring with the back kick without getting injured. A back kick is not “hard to control” when done by an expert. Is Aldo’s training partner was an expert in Taekwondo he could have easily controlled the power of his back kick. Just because it is a turning kick does not mean its impossible to kick lightly. Anyone who believes it is too hard to control is ignorant about such martial arts techniques. They have no clue what they are talking about. Sure by the average MMA guy who just picked up the back kick from watching a youtube video, or who was a green belt before in Taekwondo as a child will suck at throwing back kicks. He will be awkward, unbalanced, and lack any sort of control. These types of people are simply white belt level at kicking and need to train more. There are a lot of MMA guys who think they are martial arts masters who actually suck and lack control. Jose Aldo should have simply been drilling the back kick and working counters to it. If he did sparring the back kick should be thrown so Aldo could work on maneuvers to either block it or avoid it and counter. Olympic Taekwondo sparring drills are the best for this.

Another important thing to remember is most of the time in Taekwondo they wear a chest protector called the hogu in Korean. Olympic Taekwondo is a full contact sport so their back kicks are the best in the world. ITF Taekwondo has the exact same technique and obviously can be thrown with extreme power too an that is Conor McGregor’s background. ITF may be light contact but they would even prove more that a back kick can be controlled without injuring an opponent. But McGregor is not going to throw it light contact. WTF Olympic sparring drills wold be best with a chest protector pad worn. One can throw with medium contact and also if Aldo would miss his technique and get hit the padded chest protector would save him from a broken rib. He should have been wearing one.

Taekwondo coaches, instructors and more should be sought out by MMA gyms to make sure their fighters are being protected and given great drills for working on various kicks that Taekwondo is the best at. MMA gyms need less out dated training methods, more safety, more martial arts experts that specialize in systems and not just some dude who wrestled in high school and took a few boxing lessons. The fact Taekwondo coaches are still shunned by most MMA gyms shows that while MMA in top level organizations are increasingly showing Taekwondo techniques as extremely dangerous, brutal, and fight enders with various fighters using them, the average MMA gym and average MMA culture are still in the “Taekwondo sucks” phase of the late 90’s and early 00’s that has been proven as an ignorant view. More traditional martial arts should be embraced, instructors given jobs, safer training methods with logical progression, and traditional martial arts values of losing your ego in the dojang and a moral code to go with your training should be accepted in the MMA world. Jose Aldo should not have been injured and his training partner should be kicked out of the gym for being an idiot or at least disciplined. All of this could have been avoided if the coaches and staff at Aldo’s gym weren’t clueless about Taekwondo.

Taekwondo Provides Techniques For A Deadly MMA Arsenal

        I always have to list when a Taekwondo technique worked in an MMA fight just to prove to the TKD-haters and naysayers that want to believe that Taekwondo sucks are wrong. Shawn Jordan hook kicked Derrick Lewis in the face and knocked him down and dazed him and finished him with punches to knock him out for the win.

        Taekwondo kicks can be used by fat heavy weight guys who do not have 6 pack abs to full effect and I love it! You do not have to have the stereotypical “Oympic Taekwondo body” to use Taekwondo in brutal fashion and kick butt.

        The way he threw the kick was the best way for causing more damage. Look closely at his heel hitting right on the jaw. An even better place he could have kicked is the temple on the side of the head. The hook kick can whip hard and cause the heel to dig into the face and head of an opponent or attacker. This is how you knock someone out. The hook kick also can appear to be a low kick towards the leg but instantly pops up around to the face. It is tricky and with all of the leg kicking MMA guys do it is a confusing kick and when done spontaneously as a counter is hard to see coming!

        Taekwondo provide brutal and dynamic kicks that many other martial arts under utilize or simply do not use at all. Taekwondo kicks are supposed to be thrown non-telegraphically unlike many Muay Thai kicks which are slower with the leg pump or switch of the feet before throwing just telling your opponent, “Hey I am NOW going to use this kick toward you right now.” So using Taekwondo can sometimes overrule other striking styles.

Taekwondo For Fighting Slip Rope Training

        Here is a great drill for working on fast footwork and speed and head movement.

Dodging punches and kicks is important. This drill uses twine taped to posts. You can use it for fast pivoting and footwork and ducking punches. Make sure to throw punches and kicks as well. I have tied 4 strings around in various places, in the middle it makes kind of an “x” or “+” shape. You can duck and slip under in multiple directions. This drill will make your legs strong and help with instability. If you have joint problems this drill might be tough, but if you do it right it is a fun way to work on strengthening the thigh muscles from the squatting down over and over. This drill also can simulate multiple attackers from various directions. Do this in 3 minute drills. Try it! This is Taekwondo for serious fighting and MMA.

Try it yourself!

Conor McGregor VS Dennis Sever Is Proof That Taekwondo Fighting Is Exciting

        At the last UFC Fight Night the headlining bout between Conor McGregor and Dennis Sever was action packed. Dennis Sever gained notoriety for his devastating spinning back kick knockouts. He is not specifically a Taekwondo fighter but his kicks are definitely borrowed from Taekwondo. Conor McGregor on the other hand is a Taekwondo fighter, but I must admit, he is an ITF Taekwondo fighter. He has trained much of his life in ITF Taekwondo. Of course this blog has negative opinions on the ITF as an organization, their propaganda, their politics, sine wave, Choi worship, and annoying arrogance, but that is not to say that ITF Taekwondo individuals cannot, and are not good fighters. After all they have basically the exact same techniques as regular Kukki-Taekwondo. McGregor uses them all!

        McGregor and Sever mixed it up with plenty of kicks, McGregor threw spin kicks but missed. He threw round kicks, front kicks and an axe kick. Sever through high kicks as well. Plenty of great punching exchanges occurred where McGregor blocked and parried most of them. McGregor was in total control and looked great. Sever got miserably defeated with a TKO with strikes. It was an awesome fight!

        McGregor and other traditional martial artists are paving the way to re-establish traditional styles as top notch, serious fighting systems that are deadly enough on their own. Conor McGregor shows that Taekwondo is exciting and we need more Taekwondo in MMA!

Taekwondo Dominated The UFC 182 Prelims Last Night

        I have been saying it before and I will say it again, Taekwondo is proving itself in MMA and should be taken seriously by MMA gyms. They need to start hiring Taekwondo striking coaches on top of their Muay Thai and Boxing coaches. There is no shame in hiring a traditional martial artist for striking in MMA. Last night on the UFC 182 Preliminary fights on Fox Sports 1 Taekwondo proved itself twice as a factor in the victories given to 2 fighters with legitimate Taekwondo backgrounds.

        The first Taekwondo win last night was Cody Garbrandt who has a Taekwondo training history and has shown it in previous fights by utilizing head kicks and more. He fights out of Team Alpha Male in San Diego, California (Uriah Faber’s team) and used Taekwondo stances and movement with kicks to work his opponent Marcus Brimage, an Alabama native, fighting out of American Top Team in Florida. What is interesting is that Marcus Brimage trained at Spartan Fitness in Birmingham, Alabama when he started MMA training. He has known the head coach there for over 10 years, so he had the coach corner him during his fight. Such gyms in Alabama and their coaches are not known to be friendly towards Taekwondo, in fact much of them are outright hostile towards it. Well thanks to Taekwondo tactics and aggression Cody Garbrandt knocked this fighter out. Yes, the finishing techniques were attributed to Garbrandt’s high level amateur boxing background as well, but you cannot deny the obvious Taekwondo strategy enveloped in his kickboxing game during the fight. Even Joe Rogan was talking about his Taekwondo movements last night. It is about time these MMA coaches stop talking trash about Taekwondo and give the martial art more respect because it’s kicking your fighter’s asses. It should also be said being a jack of all trades in a typical MMA gym and a master of none is not the best way to be a fighter. Fighters with focused training in one or more martial arts alone who gain rank and skills within a system are more likely to end up better fighters in the long run.

Notice the Kick and his stance toward the end. He is standing in a Taekwondo stance and moving forward. He was doing stuff like that every round of the fight. His boxing skills did end the fight but there is no denying his Taekwondo movement and kicks did help.

        The second Taekwondo win last night was Paul Felder’s dominant win and his devastating spinning backfist on Danny Castillo. Paul Felder dominated the entire cage the entire fight. He used plenty of Taekwondo kicks and stances and movement a long with his Muay Thai. He has a 2nd degree black belt in Taekwondo and after winning the fight he claimed “Taekwondo, we spin to win!” It was great! It is necessary for fighters to study Taekwondo and Karate tactics and train in them and not simply rely on boxing or Muay Thai alone now days. Felder was bracing himself to receive a body kick as he stepped back and to the side some in order to counter by spinning around with a back fist that connected hard and knocked Castillo out on his feet before he fell to the ground. A back fist, as well as spin back fist is a Taekwondo staple, even if in most tournaments of Taekwondo such as the Olympics or ITF sparring it is illegal, it is still trained in self defense and in the forms of Taekwondo and traditional movements. It is only obvious that Taekwondo fighters can incorporate it into kickboxing and MMA.

BAM!

Slow motion…beautiful!

        So it was a great time for Taekwondo last night on the Preliminary fights. Also Jon Jones of course beat Daniel Cormier with a decision. Jon Jones also mentioned his adaptability and seemed to be describing his ability to mimmick perfectly another fighter and learn all his techniques and do them and beat him at his own game. He said “Cormier claims he is king of the grind, but I proved he is not” and said that now he, Jones himself, is the king of the grind and that he adapted to Cormiers skills making it that “Cormier defeated Cormier.” It seems he is describing the Mortal Kombat video game mirror match in MK1. Also, it only leads me to think further that he believes he is the embodiment of the character played by Kareem Abdul Jabaar in Bruce Lee’s “Game of Death” movie. He believes he is following Bruce Lee’s way I guess. He is the mystical, profound fighter with the beard and sunglasses and all.