Posts Tagged ‘UFC’

A Wonderful And Devastating Display Of Traditional Martial Arts At UFC Fight Night 82

        There was a wonderful display of traditional striking techniques shown by Stephan Thompson, a Kempo Karate expert and elite kickboxer at UFC Fight Night 82. Johnny Hendrick’s was on the receiving end up a few hard kicks and punches that knocked him out. A great article about this topic can be seen on Bleacher Report. You should give it a read.

From Bleacher Report:
“The traditional martial arts have long gotten short shrift in modern MMA. The Gracie family sponsored early UFCs as glorified infomercials for their Brazilian jiu-jitsu fighting style and quickly proved their point—that a fighter had to know how to grapple to succeed in real-world hand-to-hand combat situations.
Their early dominance briskly undid many previously long-held conventions about how to fight. Simply put, the Gracies made a lot of traditional, stand-up-oriented martial artists look like fools. Even as the legendary family faded from prominence in MMA, practitioners of no-frills western systems like wrestling and kickboxing largely went on to dominate the next two decades.
Jae C. Hong/Associated Press
Chuck Liddell throws his trademark overhand right.
Classic movie-house forms were summarily overshadowed. A lot of professional fighters may well have started in karate, taekwondo or kung fu as kids, but few of them fought like it once they arrived in the Octagon.
Former light heavyweight champion Chuck Liddell—or at least his deltoid tattoo—claimed allegiance to kempo karate, but he fought like a brawling kickboxer when it mattered.
Welterweight kingpin Georges St-Pierre boasted a background in kyokushin, but he was known more for his dynamic wrestling during the heart of his UFC career.
Only light heavyweight titlist Lyoto Machida stood out for his classic karate fighting style—and his reign on top was so short it became a punch line. Machida’s elusiveness and counterstriking were always his calling card, but his patient, unorthodox methods sometimes seemed to work against him when judged according to MMA’s unified rules.
Andre Penner/Associated Press
Lyoto Machida is one of the few to find success through karate.
The Octagon forced fighting styles to evolve with unprecedented speed, and efficiency was at a premium. Techniques that were deemed outlandish or ineffective were quickly cast aside while less flashy but operational skills became the bedrock of modern MMA.
However, this latest—and arguably most unexpected—bend in the evolutionary road makes it seem as though some brands of traditional martial arts were dismissed too hastily. Without warning, our sport has perhaps crossed another generational threshold.
Suddenly, little by little, MMA appears to be headed back to the dojo. Methods that were once considered dead on arrival in the Octagon are experiencing a revival.”

What encouraging words from a standard MMA journalist. The prove is there again. Traditional martial art styles have always been valid. There was simply a point in history where Karate, Kung Fu, and Taekwondo styles were unable to keep combat effectiveness due to a lack of venues to fight in and a decrease in the acceptance of fighting for sport. Boxing and other mainstream concepts have always been acceptable to society through the last century, but more serious ideas such as kicking the legs and other parts has been looked down upon. Only in Asia did Muay Thai stay strong and other various kickboxing methods. In Brazil they have a history of Vale Tudo and the lack of understanding of grappling and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu reign supreme for nearly 100 years in Brazil.

Karate and other styles not having to prove themselves in open combat made it easy for shysters and charlatans and other bad things such as mysticism and nonsense to invade the arts. Moves increased this concept with all of the wild Kung Fu and Ninja films in the 70’s and 80’s that allowed martial arts teachers to hide in the shadows of mysteriousness and what is foreign and unknown. Of course many true masters kept the true traditional arts alive and strong (People like Mas Oyama etc.), and traditional techniques always have worked. It is just so many did not know how to make them work and the early UFC battled int he Octagon are a poor example of martial arts masters. That is why BJJ always won as well as wrestling. Now with the knowledge of grappling and how to stuff takedowns the stand up fighters are continuously knocking people out with wrestling and boxing backgrounds. If you did not train your body to kick high and have good balance or understand elusive techniques then he has a serious chance of getting knocked out be experts in a traditional style. Fight Night 82 is an example. I believe to be a good fighter and martial artist you should specialize in something and master it. Gone are the days is just power lifting an learning to throw left hook combos and sprawl. You really have to know more and also try and master something. Jack of all trades will no longer be the champions.

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Movement Coaches Are All The Rage Now And I’m A Skeptic

        Word champion fighter Coner McGregor hired a movement coach named Ido Portal. He won his fight against Jose Aldo and now many MMA guys think they need a special movement coach to help them move better and somehow it translates into fighting.

Ido Portal is basically a hippy, new ager who created some movement routines for guillible hippies and hipsters. He even has long hair and a man-bun to “top it off.” In the above video you see all kinds of wacky movements, but most of the movements are not actually wacky and are found in various disciplines such as dance soccer, and martial arts. I am pretty sure Brazilian Jiu Jitsu guys work on crawling motions that are scene in the video. You do not need a special man-bun, new ager to teach you how to move if you already tae Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. I don’t know what COner gets out of this training except some boastful psuedo philosophical, delusion of grandeur about his abilities. The fact is often times having a delusion of grandeur about yourself and how special you are to the universe helps you win titles in MMA and boxing. Even if you do win, some of the things McGregor says about himself are still total delusions. BUt that is part of his entertainment value. His movement training is also entertaining because of its silliness and total pretentiousness.

Ido Portlan has “movement camps” that you can go to f you are rich and want to waste time moving around with other people.

Yes some of the movements are hard to do and take athleticism, but the average person does not have such prowess. Many of the movements scene are found in gymnastics and various dance styles and some sports like soccer as well as taking concepts from martial arts. But obviously training in actual martial arts s far superior than wasting time in a movement camp.

The point I am trying to make is this new movement trend, which is basically a result of the hipsters taking over MMA and BJJ, is pointless when you can just train in traditional martial arts styles of various Kung Fu, Karate styles, and Taekwondo that specialize in all kinds of movements and intense motor coordination. The MMA world has often shunned all traditional martial arts not deemed acceptable by certain folks such as wrestlers and boxers and Muay Thai guys, yet now these MMA fighters are embracing this silly movement trend. So bypassing actual martial movement styles for some hippy dude with a weird name that sounds like a bag of potatoes and an internet program is just ridiculous. Why does poomsae and kata  exist? It is total body control. Also taking grappling classes will help you move on the floor just find without a man bun new ager guiding you.

I just don’t see a point and I am septical of this coach. I kind of agree with what one poster said on the Sherdog Forums, that Ido Portal is a snake oil salesman. Sure many of the movements he teaches are good because the average child already did them for many years on the playground at the park or school. Also climbing trees. It is funny to see grown men walking aroun an hanging on stuff like it is some spiritual mind and body unifying thing when 5 year old children do it every day without a thought.

Does anyone know Ido Portal’s credentials? Why even train with this guy? Why not go to a licensed physical therapist who is an M.D. and understands the anatomy of the human body in a scientific way? That sounds far superior than some street gymnastics guy. Nevertheless, Coner McGregor is still highly entertaining an his open mindedness about martial arts is refreshing and is one reason he is good, even if I believe he is being duped by this Portal guy.

If people an spend hours doing movement training, there is no excuse as to why an MMA fighter cannot dedicate a few hours a wee studying forms from Karate or Taekwondo. I wonder if ay MMA fighter will actually see the light and start developing crisp and precise movements through actual traditional martial arts motions. Most MMA fighters have no patience to learn perfect traditional movements of martial arts and think it is a waste of time. If they would open their minds to the older combat arts they would have better technique by far instead of so many with sloppy punches. By far people with years of traditional training who transition into MMA do better than the average MMA gym member with gold belt dreams (that will most likely never come true).

Jose Aldo Broken Rib From Back Kick And Out Of UFC 189 Is From Stupid Training Practices

        The terrible news of Jose Aldo, the current UFC featherweight champion, receiving a broken rib from his idiot training partner Alcides Nunes who used a back kick in practice sparring that cracked Aldo’s rib is aggravating for fight fans who were given tons of hype of his previously upcoming fight against Conor McGregor. Now Chad Mendes, a boring wrestler is going to take Aldo’s place (uuuugh! Lay and pray fest). The reason for this broken rib is because of the ignorant ways many MMA gyms practice. Their ignorant ideas of “super tough training” seems to always cause injuries all over the MMA world. Even Cane Velasquez the now former UFC heavy weight champion did not even fight for 2 long years because of injuries at his AKA gym.

        This fight was going to be Jose Aldo who is pretty much a puncher and grappler to fight Conor McGregor who is a pretty decent striker who uses boxing and kicks from Taekwondo. McGregor has an ITF Taekwondo background and uses back kicks often and other kicks with his boxing skills. This was going to be an interesting fight. But of course as is common in MMA hyped fights an injury keeps the fans from seeing what they were told they wanted to see from months and months of intense marketing and “bad blood” between the two.

“The biggest featherweight fight ever? NOT ANYMORE!!!!

Now it’s just a unimportant “interim championship” fight…

        The truth is Jose Aldo’s injury should never have happened (obvious) and the fact it did happen only points us to the fact they have idiots at his gym who have no clue how to carefully train with someone and work on techniques with a proper and safe sparring partner. Chael Sonnen recently commented about the situation of Aldo’s injury and his training partner,

You’ve got to have training partners you can trust. I could be sparring with a guy and he forgot his mouthpiece, it wouldn’t matter. I’m not going to loosen his tooth, ever. If he goes with me, he’s going to leave in the same condition that he showed up in. He can trust me. Those are the kind of guys that you want to be working out with.

This is a very true statement that a lot of MMA gyms don’t seem to understand and allow too much ego and meatheaded jock behavior to injure may of their gym members. I know this for a fact from training at an MMA gym before. A friend of mine had his rib cracked from an moronic wrestler with an ego problem who went for a very hard takedown. People get injured all the time at these kinds of gyms. The problem is MMA has adopted the ignorant attitude that many boxing gyms have historically had that a person needs to fight really hard in sparring and get beat up to prove he is tough or man enough to be worthy to teach or given any attention. This nonsense philosophy loses so many potentially good fighters and martial artists that COULD be trained if given proper training. Not all people can just right away fight like a warrior, it has to be trained in them and taught often. People need to slow up and spar slow, work technique, not be hit so hard right away. Over time they can use harder contact. Not everyone is game to go hardcore in sparring and get hit hard. Beginners need to build confidence and bravery over time for that to happen. Then when someone is tough enough to handle it there is seriously no point in sparring all the way with full contact every night, especially if someone is a top athlete who needs to avoid getting hurt before a bout.

Traditional martial arts in my opinion is the best way to train a fighter or any kind of martial artist. There is a step-by-step process and concern for the student is given and they tale safe steps to get where they need to be. If MMA gyms stopped following the boxing theory of “proving your worth” a lot more martial artists could come out of their gyms who would be great fighters and would not want to quit. MMA is also more intense than boxing with kicks, elbows, knees, grappling and submissions. It is way more dangerous than boxing with a lot m,ore kinds of injuries. MMA training needs to be done safely.

Chael Sonnen also said,

Accidents happen. This could have been an accident. But it was a spinning kick to the midsection. That’s a very hard strike to control – it’s the same reason we don’t throw elbows in practice. They’re just too hard to control, and if one gets away, even a light one, it can cut your opponent and he’s going to need stitches. There are some things you just don’t do on a partner; you save it for the heavy bag. I’m very confused as to how this even happened 10 days before a title fight.

I will have to say while I understand his concerns about elbows, his is flat out wrong about the “spinning” back kick. Taekwondo practitioners have trained all kinds of kicks, especially the back kick without too many injuries. It totally possible to practice sparring with the back kick without getting injured. A back kick is not “hard to control” when done by an expert. Is Aldo’s training partner was an expert in Taekwondo he could have easily controlled the power of his back kick. Just because it is a turning kick does not mean its impossible to kick lightly. Anyone who believes it is too hard to control is ignorant about such martial arts techniques. They have no clue what they are talking about. Sure by the average MMA guy who just picked up the back kick from watching a youtube video, or who was a green belt before in Taekwondo as a child will suck at throwing back kicks. He will be awkward, unbalanced, and lack any sort of control. These types of people are simply white belt level at kicking and need to train more. There are a lot of MMA guys who think they are martial arts masters who actually suck and lack control. Jose Aldo should have simply been drilling the back kick and working counters to it. If he did sparring the back kick should be thrown so Aldo could work on maneuvers to either block it or avoid it and counter. Olympic Taekwondo sparring drills are the best for this.

Another important thing to remember is most of the time in Taekwondo they wear a chest protector called the hogu in Korean. Olympic Taekwondo is a full contact sport so their back kicks are the best in the world. ITF Taekwondo has the exact same technique and obviously can be thrown with extreme power too an that is Conor McGregor’s background. ITF may be light contact but they would even prove more that a back kick can be controlled without injuring an opponent. But McGregor is not going to throw it light contact. WTF Olympic sparring drills wold be best with a chest protector pad worn. One can throw with medium contact and also if Aldo would miss his technique and get hit the padded chest protector would save him from a broken rib. He should have been wearing one.

Taekwondo coaches, instructors and more should be sought out by MMA gyms to make sure their fighters are being protected and given great drills for working on various kicks that Taekwondo is the best at. MMA gyms need less out dated training methods, more safety, more martial arts experts that specialize in systems and not just some dude who wrestled in high school and took a few boxing lessons. The fact Taekwondo coaches are still shunned by most MMA gyms shows that while MMA in top level organizations are increasingly showing Taekwondo techniques as extremely dangerous, brutal, and fight enders with various fighters using them, the average MMA gym and average MMA culture are still in the “Taekwondo sucks” phase of the late 90’s and early 00’s that has been proven as an ignorant view. More traditional martial arts should be embraced, instructors given jobs, safer training methods with logical progression, and traditional martial arts values of losing your ego in the dojang and a moral code to go with your training should be accepted in the MMA world. Jose Aldo should not have been injured and his training partner should be kicked out of the gym for being an idiot or at least disciplined. All of this could have been avoided if the coaches and staff at Aldo’s gym weren’t clueless about Taekwondo.

If Anderson Silva, The GOAT of MMA, Embraces Taekwondo Then That Means Taekwondo Does Not Suck And Is A Legitimate Fighting Art

        Anderson Silva has recently made it known that he has a desire to compete in the next Olympics in the sport of Taekwondo Sparring. The Brazilian Taekwondo Confederation (WTF member of Brazil) posted on their website (in Portuguese) that Silva desires to compete in the next Olympics in 2016. He says that he has a passion to represent Brazil and that the Olympics are the dream of every high performance athlete.

        The BTC in the past has given 5th degree black belt status to Anderson Silva already. I believe it is honorary rank. I am not sure if Silva is certified by the Kukkiwon as a black belt. He may be, but I could never find anything to confirm this. If he already is ranked in the Kukkiwon then he can compete in WTF tournaments and also in the Olympics. If he does not have rank yet then he has to test and perform every poomsae to pass. I would love to see Anderson Silva performing poomsae it would be interesting. He also has to wear a dobok and black belt with pads (chest gear and head gear as well).

        What he should do is compete in very high level tournaments like nationals or other world tournaments to get himself prepared to Taekwondo sport. I think that it is very interesting that a “no holds barred” MMA fighter wants to compete in a martial art that almost every single MMA/UFC fanboy and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu bandwagon jumper has repeatedly said sucks over and over for the last 20 years. That Taekwondo is a joke, that Taekwondo does not work in a real fight, that Taekwondo is a stupid sport. Well if the GOAT of the UFC and MMA says Taekwondo is a sport good enough for him to compete, that Taekwondo is a legitimate martial art then that means it is.

        Yes, Silva has recent performance enhancing drug issues, but I hope it gets resolved and he is allowed to compete in Taekwondo. It will be interesting to see how he moves, how he kicks, and how he will not punch the face and only the chest gear. I look forward to training videos and more. Will he be able to transition out of MMA, will he do well against lifelong sport Taekwondo sparring experts? This is exciting! There is a reason why Taekwondo is an Olympic level athletic endeavor.

There Are Other Reasons To Train In Martial Arts Besides Competitive Fighting

        There are all kinds of reasons to train in martial arts besides competitive fighting. In the old days of Karate nobody was concerned with sport fighting or winning points. The Okinawans and Japanese only cared about fighting in general and staying alive. Likewise, in Taekwondo’s infancy nobody was thinking about how they can create a popular sport, but how to promote a Korean way of fighting more perfect than Karate itself.

Besides fighting in general and self defense martial arts in my opinion are the ultimate fitness and health activities anyone can do. It is better than dancing, better than gymnastics, and better than just lifting weights alone. Martial arts combine everything into one. Movement of the joints in various ways, moving the body in every possible way it can move, and development of serious cardio and blood circulation. Martial arts also offer healing by strengthening the body and systems of the body. Many martial artists, including myself age pretty well. We look younger and are more fit than average people. We can last longer and have a better quality of life. On top of this is of course our self defense skills that will keep us alive longer if we are attacked. Martial arts are ultimate self preservation.

Martial arts help mental health by inducing stress relief, intense focus of the mind with forms and meditation, coordination skills, and give enjoyment and pleasure to practitioners. It keeps people busy who otherwise might be bored if they did not know a martial art style. Traditional martial arts also offer great ways for solo training such as forms that can be performed anywhere which also sharpen the mind and develop masterful techniques.

Of course with anything, martial arts also provides a way for a competitive spirit. Competition is a way to test skills and see how someone holds up with another human being. Combat sports are always there for people to participate in but are not the main goal. There are ways to compete inside the dojo with friends without entering huge tournaments or serious combat sports such as full contact kickboxing and MMA. But even so some people want to participate in MMA and see how they do. That is fine, but it should not be the sole purpose of a life long martial artist. There is so more more you can do and the toll that MMA and full contact fighting events takes on the body can be a negative force in your personal martial arts journey. There is a time to retire and a time to understand to take training slow because of injuries. Over the years your body will wear down immensely and basic martial arts skills will suffer. The nature of MMA is hurting another and avoiding being hurt. It is impossible to not get hurt yourself as every fight you will get hit. Over time it can cause brain damage and serious joint injuries and arthritis. I believe it is possible to regress physically and regress as a martial artist with too much combat participation.

Frank Mir, ex-UFC heavy weight champion mentions very profound things about MMA:

Almost everybody at the UFC level can fight through an injury. We’re all hurt by the time the fight comes. I’m starting camps off with the injuries that I haven’t properly addressed and that’s affecting the way I train, movements we’re using and what we can do on a certain day. I’ve got Forrest Griffin making jokes about it like, ‘It’s time to retire when I train like Mir.’ I’m like, ‘what are you saying?’ He’s like, ‘Well you walk in the gym, what doesn’t hurt?’ So I was like, ‘well, you’re right.’ So I was like, let me take time off, address these issues and train healthy – relatively speaking for what we do in our sport – then I’ll keep fighting. But it’s to the point where I’m only 35-years-old and you know, the quality of life. I’d like to play a pickup game of baseball with my kids…So that’s kind of the decisions and why I did what I did.”

Frank Mir understands that having a high quality of life is important, not just for himself, but for his family. It is a fact that someone who trains hard in a martial art style who does not have injuries or brain damage can train harder and better than someone who has such injuries.

If someone only participated in a minimal level of combat sports, or none at all except dojang training, he possibly will have better technique, better health, better cardio, better power and proper body mechanics than an old retired MMA fighter with 50+ fights. In self defense who will do better at this point? Obviously combat experience is important to factor in, but with enough combat training in a dojang or dojo a person can still master a martial art and effectively win a street fight. He can also train in martial arts longer during his life and benefit his martial arts style and community longer than someone who has too many injuries.

Being a life long martial artist also has the duty of promoting that martial art, teaching it to new students, developing new techniques and keeping the art alive. I often find it strange many MMA fighters who retire have nothing much to do with teaching martial arts or starting a martial arts gym business afterward. Some simply just do other things and walk away. Even professional boxes. I don’t see Mike Tyson running a gym or promoting his boxing to new generations. Maybe he does in a way that I do not know, but he is basically in movies, doing 1 man Broadway shows, developing an animated TV show, writing books etc. But he is not being a boxing instructor. The professional fight scene seems to exist for personal glory more than enjoying a martial arts community and making training and practice a life long journey. There is no end to training and practice for a Taekwondoin. We will go until we are 100 years old until we die. We should be teaching and passing on concepts and martial arts to new and younger people.

Benson Henderson said it best after his fight with Nick Diaz in 2012 when he claimed there is more to life than fighting. He said,

Fighting’s cool. I love this guys, thank you guys for all of the support. Seattle, I love you, but fighting is just a small part. There’s a lot more to life, guys. There’s a lot more to life. Hug on your loved ones, cherish them. These moments we have together, they’re a lot shorter than you think.

Simply just to fight in a sport, I believe, is not the sole reason to train in martial arts. Living life and enjoying other things is important too and martial arts themselves, even without competition, help a person achieve a higher quality of life than if one was not training in them. There is much benefit also for people who train without fighting.

There is a current and ignorant trend that says the only reason to train in any martial art is if you compete. If you do not compete you are somehow a deficient martial artist and doing something that is pointless. Also, you are not a real fighter. This is bogus. Anyone who trains in a combat art with the intention of fully embracing it’s self defense aspects while enjoying its other benefits is literally a fighter in their being. The attitude of a fighter is not only displayed in combat sports or street fighting. Does a soldier in the military only become a soldier when fighting in a war? What about during times of peace? Are they not real soldiers unless they become combat veterans? That would be absurd. Of course they are still soldiers. Someone who trains to be a soldier is a soldier whether or not they ever fight in a war their entire life. A martial artist is likewise a fighter whether or not they literally fight people in combat or self defense or not. The fact is they are seriously training.

There are many good reasons to train in martial arts besides competitive fighting and they are just as valid as one who has a quest for MMA glory. I plan to teach Taekwondo and practice it for the rest of my life. I also plan to train in other styles as well until I can no longer do it. I plan to always be involved in the martial arts world through teaching, promoting, and training. Too many injuries from too much heavy sparring is detrimental to a martial arts lifestyle, but it is necessary to train with sparring to truly encompass the full range of martial arts perfection. It all depends on your attitude. There is nothing wrong with MMA, but trendy MMA hipster culture is full of ignorant people who have never learned what being a true martial artist is. A few intelligent fighters do understand this as well as MMA students, but the popular trendy culture surrounding it needs to be ignored while true martial artists become masters and perfect technique into old age and never quit.

 

Conor McGregor VS Dennis Sever Is Proof That Taekwondo Fighting Is Exciting

        At the last UFC Fight Night the headlining bout between Conor McGregor and Dennis Sever was action packed. Dennis Sever gained notoriety for his devastating spinning back kick knockouts. He is not specifically a Taekwondo fighter but his kicks are definitely borrowed from Taekwondo. Conor McGregor on the other hand is a Taekwondo fighter, but I must admit, he is an ITF Taekwondo fighter. He has trained much of his life in ITF Taekwondo. Of course this blog has negative opinions on the ITF as an organization, their propaganda, their politics, sine wave, Choi worship, and annoying arrogance, but that is not to say that ITF Taekwondo individuals cannot, and are not good fighters. After all they have basically the exact same techniques as regular Kukki-Taekwondo. McGregor uses them all!

        McGregor and Sever mixed it up with plenty of kicks, McGregor threw spin kicks but missed. He threw round kicks, front kicks and an axe kick. Sever through high kicks as well. Plenty of great punching exchanges occurred where McGregor blocked and parried most of them. McGregor was in total control and looked great. Sever got miserably defeated with a TKO with strikes. It was an awesome fight!

        McGregor and other traditional martial artists are paving the way to re-establish traditional styles as top notch, serious fighting systems that are deadly enough on their own. Conor McGregor shows that Taekwondo is exciting and we need more Taekwondo in MMA!

Taekwondo Dominated The UFC 182 Prelims Last Night

        I have been saying it before and I will say it again, Taekwondo is proving itself in MMA and should be taken seriously by MMA gyms. They need to start hiring Taekwondo striking coaches on top of their Muay Thai and Boxing coaches. There is no shame in hiring a traditional martial artist for striking in MMA. Last night on the UFC 182 Preliminary fights on Fox Sports 1 Taekwondo proved itself twice as a factor in the victories given to 2 fighters with legitimate Taekwondo backgrounds.

        The first Taekwondo win last night was Cody Garbrandt who has a Taekwondo training history and has shown it in previous fights by utilizing head kicks and more. He fights out of Team Alpha Male in San Diego, California (Uriah Faber’s team) and used Taekwondo stances and movement with kicks to work his opponent Marcus Brimage, an Alabama native, fighting out of American Top Team in Florida. What is interesting is that Marcus Brimage trained at Spartan Fitness in Birmingham, Alabama when he started MMA training. He has known the head coach there for over 10 years, so he had the coach corner him during his fight. Such gyms in Alabama and their coaches are not known to be friendly towards Taekwondo, in fact much of them are outright hostile towards it. Well thanks to Taekwondo tactics and aggression Cody Garbrandt knocked this fighter out. Yes, the finishing techniques were attributed to Garbrandt’s high level amateur boxing background as well, but you cannot deny the obvious Taekwondo strategy enveloped in his kickboxing game during the fight. Even Joe Rogan was talking about his Taekwondo movements last night. It is about time these MMA coaches stop talking trash about Taekwondo and give the martial art more respect because it’s kicking your fighter’s asses. It should also be said being a jack of all trades in a typical MMA gym and a master of none is not the best way to be a fighter. Fighters with focused training in one or more martial arts alone who gain rank and skills within a system are more likely to end up better fighters in the long run.

Notice the Kick and his stance toward the end. He is standing in a Taekwondo stance and moving forward. He was doing stuff like that every round of the fight. His boxing skills did end the fight but there is no denying his Taekwondo movement and kicks did help.

        The second Taekwondo win last night was Paul Felder’s dominant win and his devastating spinning backfist on Danny Castillo. Paul Felder dominated the entire cage the entire fight. He used plenty of Taekwondo kicks and stances and movement a long with his Muay Thai. He has a 2nd degree black belt in Taekwondo and after winning the fight he claimed “Taekwondo, we spin to win!” It was great! It is necessary for fighters to study Taekwondo and Karate tactics and train in them and not simply rely on boxing or Muay Thai alone now days. Felder was bracing himself to receive a body kick as he stepped back and to the side some in order to counter by spinning around with a back fist that connected hard and knocked Castillo out on his feet before he fell to the ground. A back fist, as well as spin back fist is a Taekwondo staple, even if in most tournaments of Taekwondo such as the Olympics or ITF sparring it is illegal, it is still trained in self defense and in the forms of Taekwondo and traditional movements. It is only obvious that Taekwondo fighters can incorporate it into kickboxing and MMA.

BAM!

Slow motion…beautiful!

        So it was a great time for Taekwondo last night on the Preliminary fights. Also Jon Jones of course beat Daniel Cormier with a decision. Jon Jones also mentioned his adaptability and seemed to be describing his ability to mimmick perfectly another fighter and learn all his techniques and do them and beat him at his own game. He said “Cormier claims he is king of the grind, but I proved he is not” and said that now he, Jones himself, is the king of the grind and that he adapted to Cormiers skills making it that “Cormier defeated Cormier.” It seems he is describing the Mortal Kombat video game mirror match in MK1. Also, it only leads me to think further that he believes he is the embodiment of the character played by Kareem Abdul Jabaar in Bruce Lee’s “Game of Death” movie. He believes he is following Bruce Lee’s way I guess. He is the mystical, profound fighter with the beard and sunglasses and all.

Jon “Bones” Jones Wants To Be Kareem Abdul Jabbar In Game Of Death 

        It is apparent that Jon Jones wants to be Kareem Abdul Jabbar in Bruce Lee’s movie “Game of Death” as the “all out complete, spiritual and mystical warrior” that Jabbar played in that movie. He has the exact same look with his beard and sunglasses. He probably does not allow his hair to grow taller for “cage fighting purposes” but I wouldn’t be suprised if he grew a mini-fro.

Yep, I just thought it was funny and wanted to point it out. He even wears kind of strange, fashionably-short shorts like Jabbar did in “Game of Death.”

Jon Jones is making the fashion statement that says, “I am the true embodiment of a complete martial artist both mentally and physically, and even a mystical and profound spiritual warrior.” He may be the world champion (for now at least), but does he have delusions of grandeur? Maybe such self assured living and attitude is why he is so successful as a fighter. Even so, one day he will face an even more serious threat than Gustafsson was, but time will tell if he will still think such things about himself. He fights Daniel Cormier in 3 days at UFC 189. Their feud has been intensely building up with so much drama including a mini-(start of a)-brawl at the MGM Grand in September that blew their rivalry up in MMA media. Be sure to watch the fight this Saturday and see if Cormier will be able to humble the mystical, profound warrior Jon “Bones’ Jones!

Happy New Year!!! 2015 wooo!!

 

A Round Kick Is A Fight Ender

        A round kick is a very basic technique and probably the kick one will most often use in a fight. It is used more than any kick. It can be a fight ender. The regular round kick from most martial arts systems use the lower shin area and instep, top of the foot for impact. Karate being the most popular art for decades last century has emphasized kick snapping kicks with the instep to targets on an opponents body. Taekwondo, coming from Shotokan then became the next world’s most popular martial art and held that title for a very long time. Taekwondo kicks much like Karate because Taekwondo basically is a kind of Karate since it has a strong historic link to Shotokan Karate. Shotokan round kicks and Taekwondo round kicks are basically performed the same.

        It is very hard for the average know-it-all MMA fanboy or Muay Thai guy to understand that you do not always have to hit with the shin, use a loose and wide swinging leg, and turn 360 degrees after every round kick you throw. You can simply kick the way Karate kicks and hurt someone badly.

        Last night on the UFC Fight Night Lyoto Machida used a basic Shotokan round kick and hit DB Dolloway on the body and crumbled him. Dolloway slowly began to fall as Machida went in for the kill with multiple punches until he was on the floor doing nothing about it as the referee stopped the fight declaring Machida the winner. All Machida did was use timing, brains, and focus. He saw a target available and threw a very hard round kick with his instep making impact. His leg was chambered like a Karate kick with the knee aiming at the target and BAM! it hit. It was a delayed reaction for a split second before Dolloway held his rib and tried to pretend he was not hurt but to no avail he had to react to the pain and misery of the kick and eventually fall.

        Round kicks are serious business. You do not have to use a Muay Thai style shin kick where you spin 360 degrees if you miss. Often times people who want to shadow box with kicks will make sure you damn well know they know real fighting by spinning around in a full circle after throwing a round kick. If someone does not go into a 360s degree spin after their round kick people will think they are simply “Karate dorks” or “Taekwondo idiots” who don’t know how to REALLY kickbox. It is pretty pretentious. The truth is, most often you can tell a beginner and low experienced level fighter by their intentional spins after throwing round kicks for absolutely NO reason but to look cool like they know the REAL way to Kickbox. Like they know Muay Thai.

        Karate kicks and Taekwondo kicks are faster, more agile, and can be performed with pinpoint accuracy. Whereas a standard Muay Thai kick is heavier, often a harder impact (not always though), yet it’s impact covers a wider range on the opponents body with less pinpoint accuracy. Shins are devastating and it is important to understand how to kick with heavy rotation like Muay Thai, but it is not the only way to throw a round kick and knowing the fast and quick retracting kicks of Karate and Taekwondo are also important. They allow for traveling forward and covering distance and enable aperson to throw multiple kick combos using both legs. Most often a Muay Thai kick will be thrown once and very hard but not too many combos are available when overexerting. Know exactly how much force you need to use to defeat someone is a skill that only expert martial artists understand. Not the average MMA fan. So hopefully the amazing round kick of Lyoto Machida that landed last night will help get rid of the negative stigma that current low-brow pop-culture followers, who think they are fighters and MMA masters at Buffalo Wild Wings UFC night have against anyone who wears a uniform and colored belt when they train. It seems the only people allowed to wear a gi and colored belt are Brazilian Jiu Jitsu people, but anyone sporting a Karate gi or Taekwondo dobok is shunned.

        One time I was able to pull of such a devastating round kick. It was a left leg round kick just like Machida’s. It was at the University Fight Club I started at my university for MMA and all martial arts. A wrestler guy came in and wanted to strike with me. Of course such a fight always starts out with the agreement that its low to medium contact and eventually throughout the sparring session someone’s ego gets in the way and they start throwing full power blows. The wrestler of course did not like my kicks and began to throw hard punches hitting me in the face. I threw a leg kick or two and he punched me some again and then I had had it with his nonsense so I round kicked him in the ribs full power and he fell to the ground for about 2 minutes reeling in pain and out of breath. I kind of felt bad but then again he asked for me. I may have fractured his rib, but I am not sure. Quite possibly Lyoto last night broke Dolloway’s rib as well. What an inspiration!

        Thank you Lyoto Machida for being a great representative of a true martial artist and fighter and showing the world that Karate and other traditional martial arts have a real place in the fight world and are effective fighting systems that should be respected.

Yet Another Taekwondo Technique (Hopping Sidekick) Ending A Mixed Martial Arts Fight

        The validity of Taekwondo has been proven over and over again in the UFC lately within the past few years. All kinds of kicks like spinning back kicks, ax kicks, spinning heel kicks and more have been shown to work in a fight. Just last night at UFC Fight Night 55 in Australia (which was only shown on Fight Pass unfortunately) a hopping sidekick (or skip sidekick, or skipping sidekick) ended a fight with a knockout. Whether or not the fighter was trained in Taekwondo or not is irrelevant since this kick comes from Taekwondo and is a staple of our art. Taekwondoin learn this kick around yellow belt. The kick is constantly used in Olympic Sparring competitions as well. Yet, it is used in MMA to powerful effect.

Watch:

The fighter receiving the devastating kick was completely kicked off his rocker before he hit the ground and was being punched. The kick itself would have ended the fight, but the ref did not call it immediately so punched were thrown for extra punishment.

Here is a YouTube video of it with dubbed in WWE Pro Wrestling commentators:

Yes, it sort of is like the “Super Kick Sweet Chin Music” move that Shawn Michaels always did. But even he copied it from Taekwondo. But of course you cannot expect MMA journalists to be the smartest, or most knowledgeable when it comes to actual martial arts.

Watch Taekwondo Master Woo from YouTube teach and demonstrating the skipping sidekick.

Here is an old sparring video from around 2003 of an old Chinese dude owning an ATA black belt guy with skipping sidekicks and back kicks:

This shows the step sidekick has often been used in competition for decades way before popular MMA. Of course they have pads on and the guy throwing the kicks is 57 so it was not a knockout but it still shows great power. Some people can break 6 or more boards with this techniques as well.

This just shows you that the validity of Taekwondo as a serious fighting art can apply to MMA fighting, and our dynamic kicking techniques deserve tons of respect. Muay Thai is not the only effective striking system, and throwing Muay Thai style kicks is not the only effective way to kick. Now days fighters must mix up their kicks. This must shatter the hearts of wannabe tough guy “MMA Onlyist” neanderthals who still claim Taekwondo sucks and does not work in a fight. They will simply be in denial. I am sure some MMA journalist will start calling this an MMA kick and give it some stupid name (like what happened with the downward round kick being called “the MMA Brazilian Kick” which is actually Korean).

And yes, Taekwondo is not the only martial art that has such sidekicks. Karate styles have it too but the Koreans developed it, made it popular, and refined it to perfection in Taekwondo. Taekwondo was the first style using it excessively in tournaments back in the old days.

Learn the hopping/skipping/skip side kick and use it on somebody!

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White Dragon is a 3rd dan Taekwondo Black Belt with over 19 years experience in the Martial Arts and head instructor of the White Dragon Dojang Martial Arts Training Program.