Posts Tagged ‘US Marines’

A Teakwondo Axe Kick To The Nuts Is An Effective Technique

        Taekwondo is known for a very strong axe kick. The axe kick is one of the few kicks of Taekwondo that make it a unique martial art. Bring your heek up and smash it down on a target, usually the head and face of someone. As Taekwondoin we call this technique nareo-chagi or tokae-bal which are Korean language terms for what we English speakers simply call an axe (or ax) kick.

Olympic Taekwondo axe kick to the face

Demonstrating the Taekwondo axe kick

Even kickboxer’s adopted the axe kick

Here is an axe kick thrown to the face with a very hard impact in Korea between 2 Taekwondo fighters practicing in house sparring, it is the second kick to the face in the video which starts at 1:16:

Well that was a fight ender! What power!

The axe kick can be very powerful with a full forced pull down of the heel into a target. The lower to the ground a target is the more impact, and thus, more damage the heel or sole of the foot will cause. The axe kick is so effective that the U.S. Marines adopted it into their martial arts program.

The marines call the axe kick the “stomp kick.” It really is not so much of a downward stomp as it is an axe kick. This technique is meant to kill.

Before the Marine Core Martial Arts Program there was the Marines LINE Program. The linear infighting neural-override engagement program was the precursor to the MCMAP system of today. In the older U.S. Marines Close-Qaurters Combat Manual an axe kick (stomp kick) finishing technique is shown practically every time a takedown is committed:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now seeing as the axe kick is a powerful and deadly technique, especially to targets low or on the ground such as the neck, or head imagine what could happen if another area, say the groin was the target!

       Yes, a good ol’ Taekwondo axe kick to the nether regions to an opponent is an effective technique. The way it would work is if the attacker, or opponent is on his back on the ground in front of you. This would happen if someone who is fighting you fell backwards or was thrown down. They may not be able to get up right away due to the possibility of you kicking their face or punching them. Most often people who would purposely lay on their back would have some sort of grappling background such as Brazilian Jiu Jitsu or he trains MMA. The reason someone would lay there is to hope for you to get inside their guard so they could work a submission. Also, they would want to protect their body from kicks by positioning their legs out so you hit their shins instead.

        Here is the axe kick shown in action on a real opponent in an MMA fight and how effective it hurt the opponent:

Even though the axe kick is illegal in MMA, does not mean it does not work. Imagine that same axe kick on an attacker who fell on his back on the streets who is not wearing a cup at all. Imagine the damage and total pain he wold feel! End of fight possibly and demoralizing. Imagine the force of an axe kick with deadly intention such as the Marine’s “stomp” with the precision of a practiced and masterful Taekwondo fighter. Ouch!

Here is another example from MMA:

Now to effectively use the ax kick on someone’s ball or simply anyone’s (male or female) groin area it must be timed properly. The person fighting you has a few options to defend it. The use of legs to deflect your kick can work as well as using the feet to intercept and redirect your heel as it falls down. he can turn his shin over to block your foot, do an up kick to kick your leg or foot, or he can simply roll out of the way if he is fast enough (or you are too slow). He can also catch your foot and drag you on the ground such as this video:

Even though the downed fighter re-directed the axe kick it still hit his groin and it still had to have hurt him, but his sheer determination and pure adrenaline kept him fighting, which can often be the case with someone trying to kill you. Yes, if someone is trying to kill you and he falls backwards you could run, but what if he gets up and chases you? You will have to fight him again. If you are not a marathon runner just fight him there and aim for targets to hit in order to take away his will or functionality. To demoralize an attacker one must have a very accurate and powerful axe kick that will destroy the groin and stop the fight, and his determination to fight.

I for one fully support the use of the Taekwondo axe kick on the balls. This technique has a high degree of chance working on the typical Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fighter who is trying to bait you into his open guard. Well his “open” guard is simply asking for a swift axe kick to his groin as hard as possible. Who needs to worry about grappling him when you could axe kick his nuts! but beware, if you miss he will probably catch your foot and leg and go for a seriously brutal submission such as the heel hook or knee bar. So make sure you train for this and aim correctly and time it just right so he does not intercept it. So in a Taekwondo VS Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fight the Taekwondo fighter should try to capitalize on the axe kick to the groin if he can do it. If you are taken down and escape immediately stand up and move away then re-engage him with an axe kick if he has open guard. If you have boots on this technique will hurt even more.

Practice your axe kicks to a downed oponent! Especially to vital targets such as the head, neck, and……GROIN! Tae Kwon Do!

Here is how to train in order to axe kick somebody in the balls:

Laying down an attacker for 5 or so minutes with a brutal axe kick to the groin is sufficient amount of time for you to get away or consider yourself as the victor of the fight.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

White Dragon is a 3rd dan Taekwondo Black Belt with over 19 years experience in the Martial Arts and head instructor of the White Dragon Dojang Martial Arts Training Program. 

Taekwondo Is Effective For A Self Defense Program:  Why Taekwondo Is More Effective Than A Reality Based Self Defense Course (Part 2)

II. Taekwondo is proven in war and used by U.S. Special Forces

War is a proving ground for what tactics work in an unpredictable chaotic environment. This of course goes with various weapons and vehicles, but even more so for unarmed combat. Taekwondo has been shown effective in this arena. Morgan (1992) states,

As anyone who has faced the army of the Republic of  Korea can testify, Taekwondo can be a devastating method of unarmed fighting” (p. 53).

 

Taekwondo was proven battle effective in the Vietnam War

Taekwondo is used by the Korean military to train troops for combat including being used in actual combat in the Vietnam War. Korean Special forces currently of course, train in their nation’s martial art of Taekwondo. Korean Taekwondo masters even taught the U.S. Military and South Vietnamese the art of Taekwondo during the war in Vietnam. Korea had special combat units that specifically trained in Taekwondo. They even spent a monumental amount of time training on base in Vietnam. They wore full dobok (Taekwondo uniform) attire. In a November 1968 article in Black Belt Magazine written by Jack E. Swift titled “Budo Demolition: The Famed Tiger Division of the Korean Army in Action!” it is explained how hardcore the special Korean Tiger Division was at fighting while using Taekwondo and how they killed many Viet Cong soldiers using brutal hand to hand combat (kidokwan.org/). Their effectiveness led to the interest of the U.S. military noticing that the Korean’s martial arts abilities would be useful for U.S. soldiers to learn.

 

The U.S. Military adopted Taekwondo techniques into their combatives programs

Consulting with Korean Taekwondo masters the U.S. government incorporated Taekwondo into the U.S. Military combat systems. U.S. Army Special Forces previously used Taekwondo and Karate for their combat studies and even have a military combat manual originally printed by the pentagon in the 1980 called “Hand-To-Hand Fighting (Karate/Tae-Kwon-Do)”(ST 31-204). This manual even outlines a timeline for a Taekwondo/Karate training program which included traditional forms practice. It should be noted that during this time the word “Karate” was used interchangeably for both Korean and Japanese martial arts. The U.S. Special Forces manual mentioned above also mentions that Taekwondo is the Korean style of Karate (p. 4). The current U.S. Military has incorporated Taekwondo techniques into its branches combat systems for training soldiers in hand to hand fighting. On an episode of Human Weapon featuring the “Marine Corps Martial Arts Program” it is explained that the military martial arts program of the Marines features kicks, blocks, and open handed strikes from Taekwondo and Karate (3:09).

Marines since the Korean War have also been stationed in Korea where they picked up “Korean Karate” techniques from Tang Soo Do (which was incorporated into Taekwondo along with 9 other martial arts schools to form Taekwondo in 1955) and Taekwondo. The Marine Core Martial Arts manual (MCRP 3-02B) mentions that far eastern martial arts such as Karate developed into the MCMAP system, which would include Taekwondo (Korean Karate). Taekwondo was also taught to CIA and other operatives from the U.S. government by grandmasters such as Grandmaster Tae Hong Choi (1935-2009) of Oregon who also taught U.S. Forces in Vietnam. In a newspaper article in the Oregonian Jung (2009) states,

While in the Korean army, he fought in the Vietnam War and taught hand-to-hand combat skills to Korean and U.S. special forces. That got him his next job of instructing hand-to-hand combat for top-level U.S. security agents, his family said, and he moved to Washington, D.C., in 1971.” (oregonlive.com)

A pamphlet at his memorial service in 2009 states:

…in the mid 60’s he found himself stationed in South Vietnam as a hand-to-hand combat instructor to the US Special Forces and South Vietnamese Army. His Eventful life continued as Grandmaster found himself training secret service agents, presidential bodyguards and CIA operatives.” (trainingforblackbelt.wordpress.com)                           

Grandmaster Tae Hong Choi

There were a variety of Taekwondo grandmasters sought out to teach the military and government agents hand to hand combat techniques.

 

The Military and CIA shows Taekwondo is good for civilian self defense

If the U.S. government’s military and CIA operatives thought Taekwondo techniques were effective for serious life or death combat and included it into their training for elite soldiers and operatives, then it is plausible that Taekwondo itself is an effective martial art to use for modern self defense studies in and of itself. The military creates combatives programs that will train an unlearned soldier from basic training in order to learn fast and simple fighting techniques as well as train mental discipline to instill a will-to-win and extreme aggression for survival in a real fight. There is absolutely no reason why such things cannot be taught within a Taekwondo program using the martial art’s specific techniques. Even more, a serious martial arts student trains for mastery of martial arts and becomes more advanced than the average unlearned person who simply passed a combatives course in 2 months.

Contrary to how it plays out in some commercial schools, not every student in Taekwondo or any other traditional martial art deserves to earn a black belt or even will get good enough to earn it. Some people might train for awhile and learn the basics, yet effective, for self defense. The serious student will master the basics, earn a black belt, and apply very advanced techniques far beyond even a military combatives course. Martial arts focus on mastery of skills which is better than taking a seminar from an RBSD instructor that lasts only 3 hours (or even a 2 week course or what have you). Real self defense success takes a large amount of time to earn through methodical learning.

 

Go back to Part 1                                                                                                Go on to Part 3

__________________________________________________________________________________________

White Dragon is a 3rd dan Taekwondo Black Belt with over 19 years experience in the Martial Arts and head instructor of the White Dragon Dojang Martial Arts Training Program.